Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach

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Prentice Hall, 1999 - Comparative law - 403 pages
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Hoping to encourage the international sharing and borrowing of ideas in criminal justice, the author examines traditional concerns of introductory criminal justice courses from the perspectives of countries representing Europe, Asia, North and South America, Latin America, Australia, and the Pacific

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Contents

Chapter
1
Comparison through Classification
16
Comparing Crime Rates
33
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (1999)

Philip L. Reichel earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Kansas State University and is currently Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Northern Colorado. He is the author of Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach (6th ed., 2013), co-author of Corrections (2013), and co-editor of Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities (2012). Dr. Reichel has also authored or co-authored more than 30 articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries. He has lectured at universities in Austria, Germany, and Poland; participated in a panel for the United Nations University; was a presenter for a United Nations crime prevention webinar; presented papers at side events during the United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Brazil) and the United Nations Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Vienna); and was an invited speaker at Zhejiang Police College in Hangzhou, China. He was asked to provide a contribution for an anthology of 14 esteemed scholars who have made a significant contribution to the discipline of criminal justice within a comparative/international context (Lessons From International Criminology/Comparative Criminology/Criminal Justice, 2004) and is an active member of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, serving as a Trustee-at-large for the latter.

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