London Society, Volume 4; Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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William Clowes and Sons, 1864 - English literature
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Page 544 - And she said unto him, My father, if thou hast opened thy mouth unto the LORD, do to me according to that which hath proceeded out of thy mouth; forasmuch as the LORD hath taken vengeance for thee of thine enemies, even of the children of Ammon.
Page 110 - To eat Westphalia ham in a morning, ride over hedges and ditches on borrowed hacks, come home in the heat of the day with a fever, and (what...
Page 77 - Or, if the ball from the stroke of the bat, or hand, but not the wrist, be held before it touch the ground, although it be hugged to the body of the catcher ; XVII.
Page 110 - ... hedges and ditches on borrowed hacks ; come home in the heat ' of the day with a fever, and (what is worse a hundred times) ' with a red mark on the forehead from an uneasy hat ; all this * may qualify them to make excellent wives for fox-hunters, and ' bear abundance of ruddy-complexioned children.
Page 381 - Sigh, no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever ; One foot in sea, and one on shore ; To one thing constant never : Then sigh not so, But let them go, And be you blithe and bonny ; Converting all your sounds of woe Into Hey nonny, nonny.
Page 140 - They shall allow two minutes for each Striker to come in, and ten minutes between each innings. When the Umpire shall call " Play," the party refusing to play shall lose the match.
Page 465 - The town of Manchester, in Lancashire, must be also herein remembered and worthily for their encouragement commended, who buy the yarn of the Irish in great quantity and weaving it, return the same again into Ireland to sell. Neither doth their industry rest here ; for they buy cotton wool in London, that comes first from Cyprus and Smyrna, and at home work the same and perfect it into fustians...
Page 140 - The bowler shall deliver the ball with one foot on the ground behind the bowling crease, and within the return crease ; and shall bowl four balls before he change wickets, which he shall be permitted to do only once in the same innings.
Page 506 - ... behaviour. This correspondent is not the only sufferer in this kind, for I have long letters both from the Royal and New Exchange on the same subject. They tell me that a young fop cannot buy a pair of gloves, but he is at the same time straining for some ingenious ribaldry to say to the young woman who helps them on.
Page 1 - Then her cheek was pale and thinner than should be for one so young, And her eyes on all my motions with a mute observance hung. And I said, 'My cousin Amy, speak, and speak the truth to me, Trust me, cousin, all the current of my being sets to thee.

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