British Numismatic Journal (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Society, 1907 - Numismatics
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Contents

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Page 260 - Yet he seems to be sanguine in his constitution ; and there is something of a vivacity in his eye, that perhaps would have been more visible, if he had not been under dejected circumstances, and surrounded with...
Page 261 - He cared not to come abroad amongst us soldiers, or to see us handle our arms or do our exercise. Some said the circumstances he found us in dejected him ; I am sure the figure he made dejected us ; and, had he sent us but five thousand men of good troops, and never himself come among us, we had done other things than we have now done.
Page 314 - And when that money hath run so long that it beginneth to waste, then men bear it to the emperor's treasury and then they take new money for the old. And that money goeth throughout all the country and throughout all his provinces, for there and beyond...
Page 310 - The medal, faithful to its charge of fame, Through climes and ages bears each form and name: In one short view subjected to our eye, Gods, emperors, heroes, sages, beauties, lie. With sharpen'd sight pale antiquaries pore, Th' inscription value, but the rust adore.
Page 88 - When I remembered how the knowledge of Latin had formerly decayed throughout England, and yet many could read English writing, I began, among other various and manifold troubles of this kingdom, to translate into English the book which is called in Latin Pastoralis...
Page 260 - His speech was grave, and not very clearly expressing his thoughts, nor overmuch to the purpose, but his words were few, and his behaviour and temper seemed always composed. What he was in his diversions we know not ; here was no room for such things.
Page 61 - This year the army again went to York, and sat there one year. A. 870. This year the army rode across Mercia into EastAnglia, and took up their winter quarters at Thetford : and the same winter king Edmund fought against them, and the Danes got the victory, and slew the king, and subdued all the land, and destroyed all the minsters which they came to. The names of their chiefs who slew the king were Hingwar and Hubba.
Page 324 - Why this was such a firk of piety I ne'er heard of: bury her gold with her Tis strange her old shoes were not interred too, For fear the days of Edgar should return, When they coin'd leather.
Page 265 - For him, he is a thin ill-made man, extremely tall and awkward, of a most unpromising countenance, a good deal resembling King James the Second, and has extremely the air and look of an idiot, particularly when he laughs or prays. The first he does not often, the latter continually.
Page 260 - ... which, it must be acknowledged, were sufficient to alter the complexion even of his soul as well as of his body. His speech was grave, and not very clearly expressing his thoughts, nor overmuch to the purpose, but his words were few, and his behaviour and temper seemed always composed.

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