Discovering The News: A Social History Of American Newspapers (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Basic Books, Feb 13, 1981 - Social Science - 416 pages
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This instructive and entertaining social history of American newspapers shows that the very idea of impartial, objective “news” was the social product of the democratization of political, economic, and social life in the nineteenth century. Professor Schudson analyzes the shifts in reportorial style over the years and explains why the belief among journalists and readers alike that newspapers must be objective still lives on.
  

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Review: Discovering The News: A Social History Of American Newspapers

User Review  - Mfalco65 - Goodreads

Schudson is a phenomenal sociologist and makes such compelling points about the nature of objectivity and the role newspapers played in the development of our cities. Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
x
THE IDEAL OF OBJECTIVITY
4
THE REVOLUTION IN AMERICAN JOURNALISM IN THE AGE OF EGALITARIANISM THE PENNY PRESS
13
The Revolution of the Penny Press
15
Explanations of the Revolution in Journalism
32
The Literacy Argument
36
The Natural History Argument
40
The Age of Egalitarianism and the Press
44
Joseph Pulitzer and the New York World
92
The Rise of the New York Times
107
OBJECTIVITY BECOMES IDEOLOGY JOURNALISM AFTER WORLD WAR I
122
Losing Faith in the Democratic Market Society
123
The Decline of Facts in Journalism
135
Subjectivity and Objectivity in the Press
145
OBJECTIVITY NEWS MANAGEMENT AND THE CRITICAL CULTURE
161
News Management
165

The Social Standing of the Penny Press
51
Conclusion
58
TELLING STORIES JOURNALISM AS A VOCATION AFTER 1880
62
Science and Literary Realism
72
Occupational Ideals of Journalists
78
STORIES AND INFORMATION TWO JOURNALISMS IN THE 1890s
89
The Rise of a Critical Culture
177
The Critique of Conventional Journalismand Its Consequences
184
NOTES
196
INDEX
222
Copyright

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About the author (1981)

Michael Schudson, a Professor of Journalism at Columbia, is the author of seven books and editor of three others on the history and sociology of the American news media, the history of U.S. citizenship and political participation, and related topics. His most recent book is Why Democracies Need an Unlovable Press (2008). He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur Foundation "genius" award.

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