Early Christian Art in Ireland, Volumes 1-2 (Google eBook)

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Committee of Council on Education, 1887 - Art - 210 pages
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Page 26 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.
Page 44 - There is the same curve or batter in the outline of the wall, the stones are laid as headers and fixed in horizontal layers although they follow the batter. It is astonishing to conceive the courage and skill of the builders of this fine wall, placed as it is on the very edge of the precipice, at a vast height above the sea, with no possible standing ground outside the wall from which the builders could have worked ; yet the face is as perfect as that of Staigne Fort, the interstices of the greater...
Page 7 - Giotto, who was very courteous, took a sheet of paper, and a pencil dipped in a red colour ; then, resting his elbow on his side, to form a sort of compass, with one turn of the hand he drew a circle, so perfect and exact that it was a marvel to behold. This done, he turned, smiling to the courtier, saying,
Page 9 - It has the greatest plenty of salmon and eels; seals are frequently taken, and dolphins, as also whales; besides many sorts of shell-fish, such as mussels, in which are often found excellent pearls of all colours, red, purple, violet, and green, but mostly white.
Page 42 - has been the scene of annual pilgrimages for many centuries, and the service of the Way of the Cross is still celebrated here, though with some perfectly traditional forms of prayer and customs, such as are only found to exist among the islanders along the west coast of Ireland.
Page 68 - Ailill, his servant, required of him sacred vessels for the service of his church, then, " the holy prelate, divinely instructed, pointed out to the presbyter, in a certain stone cave of wonderful workmanship, an altar underground, having on its four corners four chalices of glass.
Page 51 - Underneath the shelf various long wooden pegs projected from the wall ; they were each about a foot and a half long, and on them hung the Abyssinian manuscripts, of which this curious library was entirely composed. The books of Abyssinia are bound in the usual way, sometimes in red leather and sometimes in wooden boards, which are occasionally elaborately carved in rude and coarse devices : they are then enclosed in a case, tied up with leather thongs; to this case is attached a strap for the convenience...
Page 42 - I deem this most worthy of praise and admiration, that the holy man wrote from beginning to end, with his own hand, the Old and New Testament, with explanatory comments on the same books, and that not once or twice, but over and over again, with a view to the eternal reward ; all the while clad in sorry garb, living on slender diet, attended and aided by his brethren, both in the Upper and Lower Monasteries, who prepared the parchments for his use.
Page 25 - Decoration is beautiful only when found in its right place, when adding to the effect of the fundamental form to be adorned; and when held in subordination and subjection to the primary idea, a noble reserve of power is felt to exist, which comes forth at the right time, and in the right place, to aid in the expression of the essential elements of the subject, emphasising its important points, and adding clearness to the beauty of its outline.
Page 42 - This holy man wrote from beginning to end, with his own hand, the Old and New Testament, with explanatory comments on the same; and that not once or twice, but over and over again, with a view to the eternal reward all the while clad in sorry garb, living on slender diet, attended and aided by his brethren both in the upper and lower monasteries...

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