Movements in European History

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 11, 2002 - History - 400 pages
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Movements in European History was written by D. H. Lawrence during 1918 and 1919 in response to Oxford University Press's invitation to prepare a textbook for schools. It is a vivid sketch of European history from ancient Rome to the early twentieth century, remaining significant in the canon of Lawrence's work as the only school textbook he ever wrote. Crumpton's introduction describes the genesis, publication and reception of the book, gives an account of the little-known Irish edition of 1926 which suffered much censorship, and identifies and analyses Lawrence's methods of using the source-books on which his writing was based. This edition uses the surviving manuscript to present a text as close to that which Lawrence wrote and corrected in proof as is now possible.
  

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Contents

General editors preface
vii
Acknowledgments
ix
Chronology
x
Cuetitles
xiv
Introduction
xv
Composition of Movements in European History July 1918May 1919
xvii
Publication and Reception
xxv
Publication and Reception of the Illustrated Edition 1925
xxviii
The Franks and Charlemagne
87
The Popes and the Emperors
100
The Crusades
116
Italy after the Hohenstaufens
133
The End of the Age of Faith
144
The Renaissance
158
The Reformation
173
The Grand Monarch
183

The Irish Edition 1926
xxxii
The Edition of 1972
xxxvii
Lawrence and His Sources
xxxviii
MOVEMENTS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY
1
Introduction for the Teacher
7
Rome
11
Constantinople
17
Christianity
25
The Germans
43
The Goths and Vandals
53
The Huns
64
Gaul
75
The French Revolution
193
Prussia
209
Italy
221
The Unification of Germany
241
Epilogue
253
Maps
267
Explanatory notes
285
Textual apparatus
309
The Sources of Movements in European History
325
A note on pounds shillings and pence
333
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda , who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

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