My Century

Front Cover
Harcourt, Incorporated, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 280 pages
14 Reviews
In a work of great originality, Germany's most eminent writer examines the victories and terrors of the twentieth century, a period of astounding change for mankind. Great events and seemingly trivial occurrences, technical developments and scientific achievements, war and disasters, and new beginnings, all unfold to display our century in its glory and grimness. A rich and lively display of Grass's extraordinary imagination, the 100 interlinked stories in this volume-one for each year from 1900 to 1999-present a historical and social portrait for the millennium, a tale of our times in all its grandeur and all its horror.

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Review: My Century

User Review  - Horia Bura - Goodreads

I have never considered Grass a great writer. This book only confirms my initial opinion. In fact, I do not know exactly which is more boring: the history of Germany in the twentieth century or his ... Read full review

Review: My Century

User Review  - Brock Spore - Goodreads

Great stuff. Understood most of it but some parts are best known to Germans. Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Born on October 16, 1927 in Gdansk, Poland, GŁnter Wilhelm Grass was a member of the Hitler Youth in the 1930s. At the age of 16, he was drafted into the German military, was wounded, and became a prisoner of war in 1945. His first novel, The Tin Drum (1959), selected by the French as the best foreign language book of 1962, is the story of Oscar Matzerath, a boy who refuses to grow up as a protest to the cruelty of German society during the war. It is the first part of his Danzig trilogy, followed by Cat and Mouse (1961) and Dog Years (1963), and was made into a movie by director Volker Schlondorff, winning the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film in 1979. His other works include Local Anaesthetic, The Flounder, Crabwalk, and Peeling the Onion. He has been honored many times, including a distinguished service medal from the Federal Republic of Germany in 1980 which he refused to accept. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

Michael Henry Heim has translated dozens of novels, plays, and essays from the German, Russian, French, Czech, Serbian, Croatian and Flemish. Highlights include the work of GA1/4nter Grass, PA(c)ter EsterhAzy, and Milan Kundera. He is the recipient of the ALTA Prize, the AATSEEL award, and the Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize.

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