Mothers and Daughters of Invention: Notes for a Revised History of Technology

Front Cover
Rutgers University Press, 1995 - Social Science - 708 pages
1 Review
Written in an engaging and accessible style, this first broadly focused compensatory history of technology not only includes women's contributions but begins the long-overdue task of redefining technology and significant technology and to value these contributions correctly. Stanley traces women's inventions in five vital areas of technology worldwide--agriculture, medicine, reproduction, machines, and computers--from prehistory (or origin) forward, profiling hundreds of women, both famous and obscure. The author does not ignore theory. She contributes a paradigm for male takeovers of technologies originated by women.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Miranda Fort is acknowledged for improvements in farming implements in 1870. However, Miranda Fort was not a woman. He was my great, great, great grandfather, a brick mason and builder in Talbot County, Georgia in the 19th century. He was married to Elizabeth Stanford and is buried in the Talbotton Cemetery. It's nice to see his talents acknowledged, however, an incorrect assumption was made based on his first name. 

Contents

Acknowledgments
xi
Women Inventors
1
Agriculture
25
Summary
85
19th and 20th Centuries
106
Summary
205
Pregnancy and Childbirth Technology
224
Contraception
237
Artificial Intelligence
503
Summary
511
Appendixes
533
Catherine Greene and the Cotton Gin
544
FoodProcessing Machines Devices
550
LWP Medical Apparatus Patentees
560
Womens 19thCentury Nursing and InvalidCare Patents from
568
Womens AutoErotic Technology
579

Summary
282
20th Century
359
Summary
428
Machine Design
442
Software
459
Applications
485
Selected 19thCentury Womens U S Patents in Menstrual Technology
587
Patents 186194
599
Bibliography
606
Index
660
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information