American Indian liberation: a theology of sovereignty

Front Cover
Orbis Books, 2008 - Religion - 170 pages
2 Reviews
Why Christian understandings of Jesus and God clash with American Indian worldviews. "Tink" Tinker of the Osage Nation describes the oppression suffered by American Indians since the arrival of European colonists, who brought a different worldview across the ocean and attempted to convert the native population to the religion they also imported. The methodology, language, and understandings of Christian beliefs of the colonists????????????????????????and the majority society since the colonial period????????????????????????have largely failed to Christianize the native population. Different conceptual frameworks and different understandings of terms made (and make) Christian doctrine particularly unappealing and at times incomprehensible to Indians.

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Review: American Indian Liberation: A Theology of Sovereignty

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

Thought-provoking and unsettling in many ways--this book opened my eyes to the way words and actions from my white ancestors have hurt and continue to hurt Native American communities. Read it, especially if you are unfamiliar with Native American culture. Read full review

Review: American Indian Liberation: A Theology of Sovereignty

User Review  - Leroy Seat - Goodreads

This was an excellently done book, but quite tough for a White Christian to read. Although he is an ordained Lutheran minister, Tinker is very critical of much in Christianity and very positive to ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Struggle Resistance Liberation and Theological Methodology
17
Creation Justice and Peace
36
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

George E. "Tink" Tinker, a member of the Osage Nation, is a professor of American Indian Cultures and Religious Traditions at Iliff School of Theology in Denver. An ordained Lutheran pastor, he is the author of several books and co-author of A Native American Theology (Orbis, 2001).