Our Southern Highlanders (Google eBook)

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Outing Publishing Company, 1913 - Appalachian Mountains - 395 pages
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Review: Our Southern Highlanders: A Narrative of Adventure in the Southern Appalachians and a Study of Life Among the Mountaineers

User Review  - David Ward - Goodreads

Our Southern Highlanders: A Narrative of Adventure in the Southern Appalachians an da Study of Life Among the Mountaineers by Horace Kephart (MacMillan Co. 1954)(917.5). I loved this! My rating: 7.5, finished 2006. Read full review

Review: Our Southern Highlanders: A Narrative of Adventure in the Southern Appalachians and a Study of Life Among the Mountaineers

User Review  - McD Crook - Goodreads

Wonderful book about life in the Smokies around the turn of the century. Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
28
III
50
IV
75
V
112
VI
126
VII
145
VIII
167
X
212
XI
234
XII
256
XIII
276
XIV
305
XV
327
XVI
354
XVII
378

IX
191

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Page 14 - And what the land is that they dwell in, whether it be good or bad; and what cities they be that they dwell in, whether in tents or in strong holds: and what the land is, whether it be fat or lean, whether there be wood therein or not. And be ye of good courage, and bring of the fruit of the land.
Page 144 - A hateful tax levied upon commodities, and adjudged not by the common judges of property, but wretches hired by those to whom excise is paid.
Page 157 - The information of our militia, returned from the westward, is uniform, that though the people there let them pass quietly, they were objects of their laughter, not of their fear ; that one thousand men could have cut off their whole force in a thousand places of the Alleghany...
Page 54 - These various splendid colors are not only in separate plants, but frequently all the varieties and shades are seen in separate branches on the same plant ; and the clusters of the blossoms cover the shrubs in such incredible profusion on the hillsides, that suddenly opening to view from dark shades, we are alarmed with apprehension of the woods being set on fire. This is certainly the most gay and brilliant flowering shrub yet known...
Page 121 - The only farm produce we-uns can sell is corn. You see for yourself that corn can't be shipped outen hyar. We can trade hit for store credit that's all. Corn juice is about all we can tote around over the country and git cash money for. Why, man, that's the only way some folks has o' payin
Page 53 - The epithet fiery, I annex to this most celebrated species of Azalea, as being expressive of the appearance of its flowers, which are in general of the colour of the finest red lead, orange and bright gold, as well as yellow and cream colour...
Page 388 - Their intense attachment to their own tribe and to their own patriarch, though politically a great evil, partook of the nature of virtue. The sentiment was misdirected and ill regulated; but still it was heroic. There must be some elevation of soul in a man who loves the society of which he is a member and the leader whom he follows with a love stronger than the love of life. It was true that the Highlander had few scruples about shedding the blood of an enemy : but it was not less true that he had...
Page 182 - Much of the opposition to the enforcement of the internal revenue laws is properly attributable to .a latent feeling of hostility to the government and laws of the United States...
Page 388 - Their courage was what great exploits achieved in all the four quarters of the globe have since proved it to be. Their intense attachment to their own tribe and to their own patriarch, though politically a great evil, partook of the nature of virtue. The sentiment was misdirected and ill regulated; but still it was heroic. There must be some elevation of soul in a man who loves the society of which he is a member and the leader whom he follows with a love stronger than the love of life.
Page 387 - He would have inhaled an atmosphere thick with peat smoke, and foul with a hundred noisome exhalations. At supper grain fit only for horses would have been set before him, accompanied by a cake of blood drawn from living cows. Some of the company with which he would have feasted would have been covered with cutaneous eruptions, and others would have been smeared with tar like sheep. His couch would have been the bare earth, dry or wet as the weather might be; and from that couch he would have risen...

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