King's Mountain and Its Heroes: History of the Battle of King's Mountain, October 7th, 1780, and the Events which Led to it (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P.G. Thomson, 1881 - King's Mountain, Battle of, 1780 - 612 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Excellent source for what happened in that decisive battle. Vivid imagery of war as well as factual and appears unbiased. Shoudl be a history buff and geneolgist's delight. And thanks to google, it's available and free.

Contents

I
17
II
37
III
48
IV
68
V
84
VI
103
VII
123
VIII
140
XII
236
XIII
264
XIV
310
XV
329
XVI
357
XVII
378
XVIII
411
XIX
425

IX
165
X
191
XI
213

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 147 - And there lay the rider, distorted and pale, With the dew on his brow, and the rust on his mail ; And the tents were all silent, the banners alone, The lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown.
Page 381 - But as the love of liberty, and attachment to the real interests and just rights of America outweigh every other consideration, we resolve that we will exert every power within us for the defense of American liberty, and for the support of her just rights and privileges; not in any precipitate, riotous or tumultuous manner, but when regularly called forth by the unanimous voice of our countrymen.
Page 547 - that if they did not desist from their opposition to the British arms, and take protection under his standard, he would march his army over the mountains, hang their leaders and lay their country waste with fire and sword...
Page 314 - An unusual number of the killed were found to have been shot in the head. Riflemen took off riflemen with such exactness, that they killed each other when taking sight, so effectually that their eyes remained after they were dead, one shut and the other open, in the usual manner of marksmen when levelling at their object.
Page 523 - ... the attack. The troops upon the right having gained the summit of the eminence, obliged the enemy to retreat along the top of the ridge to where Col.
Page 52 - We had not lain long when a rebel officer, remarkable by a hussar dress, passed towards our army, within a hundred yards of my right flank, not perceiving us. He was followed by another dressed in dark green and blue, mounted on a good bay horse, with a remarkable large high cocked hat.
Page 377 - It was the joyful annunciation of that turn of the tide of success which terminated the Revolutionary War with the seal of our independence.
Page 152 - Madam, I admire you as the handsomest woman I have seen in North Carolina. I even half way admire your zeal in a bad cause. But take my word for it, the rebellion has had its day and is now virtually put down. Give my regards to Captain Lytle and tell him to come in. He will not be asked to compromise his honor. His verbal pledge not again to take up arms against the King is all that will be asked of him.
Page 249 - When engaged you are not to wait for the word of command from me. I will show you by my example how to fight.
Page 53 - The day after, I had been telling this story to some wounded officers, who lay in the same room with me, when one of the surgeons who had been dressing the wounded rebel officers came in and told us that they had been informing him that General Washington was all the morning with the light troops, and only attended by a French officer in hussar dress, he himself dressed and mounted in every point as above described. * I am not sorry that I did not know at the time who it was.

Bibliographic information