Elements of Conveyancing: With Cursory Remarks Upon the Study of that Science, Including a List of Books, for the Use of Students and Practitioners, and Also Observations and Directions Relative to the Practice of Conveyancing, Particularly with Respect to the Perusal of Abstracts of Title, and Preparing of Deeds and Assurances, of Real and Personal Property (Google eBook)

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W. Clarke, 1821 - Conveyancing
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Page 494 - Contingent or executory remainders (whereby no present interest passes) are where the estate in remainder is limited to take effect, either to a dubious and uncertain person, or upon a dubious and uncertain event; so that the particular estate may chance to be determined, and the remainder never take effect.
Page 561 - And therefore on a feoffment to A and his heirs, to the use of B and his heirs...
Page 516 - ... lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, remainders, or other hereditaments, to the use, confidence, or trust of any other person or persons, or of any body...
Page 419 - They have not, one of them, a seisin of one half or moiety, and the other of the other moiety; neither can one be exclusively seised of one acre, and his companion of another; but each has an undivided moiety of the whole, and not the whole of an undivided moiety (j).
Page 505 - An estate in reversion is the residue of an estate left in the grantor, to commence in possession after the determination of some particular estate granted out by him.
Page 8 - Temple speaks (/), a sort of people in a condition of downright servitude, used and employed in the most servile works, and belonging, both they, their children and effects, to the lord of the soil, like the rest of the cattle or stock upon it.
Page 530 - June (1677) all declarations or creations of trusts or confidences of any lands, tenements, or hereditaments, shall be manifested and proved by some writing signed by the party who is by law enabled to declare such trust, or by his last will in writing, or else they shall be utterly void and of none effect.
Page 254 - Precedent are such as must happen or be performed before the estate can vest or be enlarged: subsequent are such, by the failure or non-performance of which an estate already vested may be defeated.
Page 507 - Before we conclude the doctrine of remainders and reversions, it may be proper to observe, that whenever a greater estate and a less coincide and meet in one and the same person, without any intermediate estate, the less is immediately annihilated ; or, in the law phrase, is said to be merged, that is, sunk or drowned in the greater.
Page 449 - This is the natural and regular consequence of the union and entirety of their interest. The interest of two joint-tenants is not only equal or similar, but also is one and the same. One has not originally a distinct moiety from the other; but, if by any subsequent act (as by alienation or forfeiture of either) the interest becomes separate and distinct: the joint-tenancy instantly ceases.

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