Function Theory of Several Complex Variables

Front Cover
American Mathematical Society, 2001 - Mathematics - 564 pages
1 Review
The theory of several complex variables can be studied from several different perspectives. In this book, Steven Krantz approaches the subject from the point of view of a classical analyst, emphasizing its function-theoretic aspects. He has taken particular care to write the book with the student in mind, with uniformly extensive and helpful explanations, numerous examples, and plentiful exercises of varying difficulty. In the spirit of a student-oriented text, Krantz begins with an introduction to the subject, including an insightful comparison of analysis of several complex variables with the more familiar theory of one complex variable. The main topics in the book include integral formulas, convexity and pseudoconvexity, methods from harmonic analysis, and several aspects of the $\overline{\partial}$ problem. Some further topics are zero sets of holomorphic functions, estimates, partial differential equations, approximation theory, the boundary behavior of holomorphic functions, inner functions, invariant metrics, and holomorphic mappings. While due attention is paid to algebraic aspects of several complex variables (sheaves, Cousin problems, etc.), the student with a background in real and complex variable theory, harmonic analysis, and differential equations will be most comfortable with this treatment. This book is suitable for a first graduate course in several complex variables.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Steven Krantz, Ph.D., is Chairman of the Mathematics Department at Washington University in St. Louis. An award-winning teacher and author, Dr. Krantz has written more than 45 books on mathematics, including "Calculus Demystified," another popular title in this series. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

Bibliographic information