The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory

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Taylor & Francis, Sep 7, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 200 pages
3 Reviews
First published in 1988, The Women Who Knew Too Much remains a classic work in film theory and criticism. The book consists of a theoretical introduction and analyses of seven important films by Alfred Hitchcock, each of which provides a basis for an analysis of the female spectator as well as of the male spectator. Modleski considers the emotional and psychic investments of men and women in female characters whose stories often undermine the mastery of the cinematic Master of Suspense. This new edition features a new chapter which considers the last 15 years of Hitchcock criticism as it relates to the ideas in this landmark book.

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Review: The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory

User Review  - Kenneth Lota - Goodreads

This book as a whole serves a useful response to Laura Mulvey's "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," the article which basically kicked off both feminist film criticism and a great deal of ... Read full review

Review: The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory

User Review  - Dan Humphrey - Goodreads

Still one of the best books in feminist film studies. Should be required reading for anyone wanting to combine these two fields in their own scholarly work. Oh, it's very entertaining, too. Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Tania Modleski is Florence R. Scott Professor of English at the University of Southern California. Among her other books are Loving with a Vengeance and Feminism without Women.

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