A pronouncing gazetteer ... (Google eBook)

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Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1851 - Science - 703 pages
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Page 69 - ALGIERS, a celebrated city, and cap. of the country of the same name, is situated on the coast of the Mediterranean, upon the declivity of a hill, on which the houses rise gradually in the form of an amphitheatre, and terminate nearly in a point at the summit. It is not above a mile and a half in circuit. The largest street is said to be 1200 paces long, and not more than 12 feet wide. The population, previous to the French conquest, had been variously estimated, from 80,000 to 200,000, and even...
Page 38 - The FLEMISH is so closely allied to the Dutch, that it may be regarded as essentially the same language. FRENCH.
Page 181 - Capac, in the lOlh or llth century of our era. Upon a lofty hill, a little N. of the city, are the ruins of a great fortress erected by the Incas, for the protection of their capital. Many parts of it are still in a state of perfect preservation. They consist of stones of extraordinary size, placed one upon another, without cement, but fitted with such nicety as not to admit the insertion of a knife between them. It would appear that Cuzco exceeds Arequipa in population, though some of the most respectable...
Page 289 - ... in Japan. All the declivities of the hills to the top, except those which are too steep, are formed into terraces or beds of different width, according to the slope, and these terraces are cultivated with the utmost care. Here, as in China, the greatest attention is paid to the collection of manure. The raising of rice is the principal object, but wheat, barley, and rye are also cultivated, though to a much smaller, extent. Indian corn is not enumerated by Thunberg among the grain-crops of Japan.
Page 44 - G, at the beginning of a word, sounds as in the English word get. In other situations, it should be pronounced like the German ch. In some German dialects, however, it is sounded, in all cases, nearly like g hard, in English.
Page 279 - Delaware. Dubois. Elkhart. Fayette. Floyd. Fountain. Franklin. Fulton. Gibson. Grant. Greene. Hamilton. Hancock. Harrison. Hendricks. Henry. Howard. Huntington. Jackson. Jasper. Jay. Jefferson. Jennings. Johnson. Knox. Kosciusko. Lagrange. Lake.
Page 243 - W. Lon.); others make Cape Apollonia the western boundary. Of all parts of Guinea, and indeed of the African coast, this is the one where European settlements and trade have been carried to the greatest extent. Its name sufficiently indicates the cause. It appears, however, that the gold for which this region formerly enjoyed an exaggerated celebrity, was chiefly procured from other portions of Africa. GOLNOW, gol'-nov, a t. of Prussia, in Pomerania, 18m. NE of Stettin. Pop. 3,600. (B.) GOM-BROON',...
Page 27 - Oh never talk again to me Of northern climes and British ladies ; It has not been your lot to see, Like me, the lovely girl of Cadiz. Although her eye be not of blue, Nor fair her locks, like English lasses, How far its own expressive hue The languid azure eye surpasses ! 2.
Page 553 - States, is meant undergraduates, or members of the four collegiate classes ; not including such as are pursuing a professional education, or such as are members of a preparatory department. Some of the Colleges above enumerated are not in full operation, and scarcely deserve a place in the table. The column of Libraries includes the number of volumes in the College Libraries and in the Students
Page 154 - Pop. 82,661. CHARLESTON, a port of entry, and the largest city of SC ; cap. of the above dist, on a tongue of land between the rivers Ashley and Cooper, which unite immediately below the town, and form a spacious harbour, communicating with the ocean at Sullivan's Island, 7m. below. The town is regularly built, and many of the streets present a handsome appearance. Charleston is connected with Hamburg, on the Savannah, by a railroad, 135 m. in length. Among the numerous charitable establishments...

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