Myths and Legends of Our Own Land: Vol. I (Google eBook)

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J.B. Lippincott, 1896 - Folklore - 318 pages
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Page 312 - ... tree within the township, to perch, or feed, or build a careless nest upon, and shall voluntarily present themselves to perform the office of gleaners after barley harvest; as long as nature shall not grow old and dote, but shall constantly remember to give the rows of Indian corn their education, by pairs: So long shall Christians be born there; and being first made meet, shall from thence be translated, to be made partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light.
Page 312 - As long as Nature shall not grow Old and dote, but shall constantly remember to give the rows of Indian Corn their education, by Pairs ; so long shall Christians be born there ; and being first made meet, shall from thence be Translated to be made partakers of the Inheritance of the Saints in Light...
Page 319 - I thank you for my ride, gentlemen, but you will live to regret it." His words were prophetic. When too late to make reparation for the wrong they had committed, the impulsive fishermen realized that they had perpetrated an act of the greatest injustice upon an innocent man. At this late day, when for years his memory has been defamed throughout the land, and the fair...
Page 211 - Chocorua had a son, and ye killed him while the sky looked bright ! Lightning blast your crops ! Winds and fire destroy your dwellings ! The Evil Spirit breathe death upon your cattle ! Your graves lie in the war-path of the Indian ! Panthers howl and wolves fatten over your bones ! Chocorua goes to the Great Spirit, his curse stays with the white man...
Page 312 - Parker, and the fruitful marshes lying beneath; as long as any free and harmless doves shall find a white oak or other tree within the township, to perch, or feed, or build a careless nest upon, and shall voluntarily present themselves to perform the office of gleaners...
Page 84 - Star, had been ravished away to crown the brown of the thunder god, who, even now, was advancing across the peaks, bending the woods and lighting the valleys with his jagged torches. Life was nothing to him longer; he resigned it. As he spoke these words he fell back, and the breath passed out of him. Then came the thunder god, and with an appalling burst of fire sent the people cowering. The roar that followed seemed to shake the earth, but the medicine-man of the tribe stood still, listening to...
Page 299 - O thou ! for whose dear sake I bear A doom so dreadful, so severe, May happy fates thy footsteps guide, And o'er thy peaceful home preside. Nor let E a's early tomb Infect thee with its baleful gloom.
Page 300 - IS INSCRIBED BY HER WEEPING FRIENDS, TO WHOM SHE ENDEARED HERSELF BY UNCOMMON TENDERNESS AND AFFECTION. ENDOWED WITH SUPERIOR ACQUIREMENTS, SHE WAS STILL MORE DISTINGUISHED BY HUMILITY AND BENEVOLENCE. LET CANDOR THROW A VEIL OVER HER FRAILTIES, FOR GREAT WAS HER CHARITY TO OTHERS. SHE SUSTAINED THE LAST PAINFUL SCENE FAR FROM EVERY FRIEND, AND EXHIBITED AN EXAMPLE OF CALM RESIGNATION. HER DEPARTURE WAS ON THE 25TH...

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