Noli Me Tangere (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 1997 - Fiction - 452 pages
4 Reviews
Noli Me Tangere is Latin for "touch me not, " an allusion to the Gospel of St. John where Jesus says to Mary Magdelene: "Touch me not, for I am not yet ascended to my Father." In this modern classic of Filipino literature, Jose P. Rizal exposes "matters...so delicate that they cannot be touched by anybody, " unfolding an epic history of the Philippines that has made it the most influential political novel in that country in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The popularity of this novel is grounded in its reflection of the turbulent times in which it was written. Its influence on Filipino political thinking, as well as on contemporary fiction, drama, opera, dance, and film, has been and continues to be enormous. The vivid characters and the harsh situations depicted still ring true today.
  

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Missing pages
Love the story and how it's been translated (compared to other editions) but pages 11-18 are missing can someone fix it please otherwise i would have rated excellent even if it's only scanned

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a tragic story about the lives of our grandparents or even greatgrandparents who experienced the cruelty of the spaniards and yet it touched my heart, telling me the harships our heroes faced to achieve our liberty. . . AWESOME BOOK!!!!XD

Contents

A Gathering
13
Crisostomo Ibarra
19
A Heretic and a Subversive
21
A Star in the Dark Night
28
Capitan Tiago
31
Idyll in an Azotea
41
Memories
49
Some Country Matters
54
The Luncheon
227
The Comments
236
The First Cloud
242
His Excellency
246
The Procession
254
Dona Consolacion
259
Right and Might
269
Two Visitors
277

The Town
59
Divide and Rule
62
All Saints Day
67
A Gathering Storm
71
Tasio
75
The Altar Boys
83
Sisa
87
Basilio
92
Souls in Anguish
97
The Travails of a Schoolmaster
103
The Meeting in the Townhall
112
A Mothers Story
123
Lights and Shadow
131
The Fishing Excursion
135
In the Woods
147
EKas and Salome
158
In the Philosophers Home
164
The Eve of the Fiesta
175
At Nightfall
182
Letters
189
The Morning
196
In the Church
201
The Sermon
205
The Hoist
214
Free Thinker
223
The Espadana Couple
280
Plans
291
An Examination of Conscience
294
The Fugitives
300
The Cockpit
306
Two Ladies
315
The Enigma
320
The Voice of the Persecuted
323
The Family of Elias
332
Changes
339
The Card of the Dead and the Shadows
343
A Good Day Is Foretold by the Morning
348
Discovery
353
The Catastrophe
359
Fact and Fancy
365
Woe to the Vanquished
372
The Culprit
380
Patriotism and SelfInterest
384
Wedding Plans for Maria Clara
393
Pursuit in the Lake
403
Padre Damaso Explains
410
Christmas Eve
414
Epilogue
422
Notes
427
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Jose Rizal is regarded as a national hero who died for his country's freedom. Born into an affluent family, Rizal was educated at the best Manila schools and went on to enter the University of Santo Tomas. Unlike many of his fellow students, Rizal was not Spanish, but Filipino, and he quickly "learned to understand better in what sort of world I was. In it there were privileges for some and rules for others, and assuredly the discrimination was not based on capacity." It was while he was studying medicine at the university that Rizal began writing poems and essays. Beginning in 1882, Rizal attended universities in Madrid, Paris, Heidelberg, and Berlin, where he became involved in the reformist movement and regularly contributed essays to propagandist publications. These writings are powerful indictments against Spain's racial oppression of the Filipinos. While in Europe, Rizal published his most famous works. Published in 1887 and 1891, Rizal's two novels, The Lost Eden (Noli me tangere) and its sequel The Subversive (El filibusterismo), mark a transition in history as well as literature. With their vivid depiction of Filipino suffering under colonial rule, they served as one catalyst in the 1896 Philippine Revolution, helping to end Spanish rule and with it an era of Spanish literature. While Rizal was a prolific writer of essays, poetry, and drama, it is as a novelist that he became a model for future generations of writers. In 1892 Rizal returned to the Philippines, where he founded the reformist organization La Liga Filipina. Although he was not a proponent of revolution, Rizal was considered a subversive. He was named as an instigator in the 1896 revolt, which he opposed, and was sentenced to death. His final poem written before his execution, "My Last Farewell," is recognized as an outstanding poetic elegy.

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