Dixon's (the Celebrated Buffo Singer) Oddities: A Collection of Nerve Working, Side Cracking, Etc. Songs as Sung by G. Dixon (Google eBook)

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Mack, Andrus & Woodruff, 1842 - 36 pages
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Page 35 - Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave; And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.
Page 98 - THERE is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet ; Oh ! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart. Yet it was not that Nature had shed o'er the scene Her purest of crystal and brightest of green; 'Twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill, Oh ! no— it was something more exquisite still.
Page 99 - St. Ann's our parting hymn ! Row, brothers, row, the stream runs fast, The rapids are near, and the daylight's past.
Page 46 - His form was of the manliest beauty. His heart was kind and soft ; Faithful below he did his duty, But now he's gone aloft. Tom never from his word departed His virtues were so rare ; His friends were many and true-hearted. His Poll was kind and fair : And then he'd sing so blithe and jolly; Ah, many's the time and oft!
Page 35 - Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming. Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
Page 47 - O' my sweet Highland Mary. How sweetly bloom'd the gay green birk, How rich the hawthorn's blossom, As underneath their fragrant shade I clasp'd her to my bosom ! The golden hours on angel wings Flew o'er me and my dearie; For dear to me as light and life Was my sweet Highland Mary. Wi' mony a vow and lock'd embrace Our parting was fu' tender; And pledging aft to meet again, We tore oursels asunder; But, Oh!
Page 19 - Maiden! a nameless life I lead, A nameless death I'll die; The fiend whose lantern lights the mead Were better mate than I ! And when I'm with my comrades met Beneath the greenwood bough, — What once we were we all forget, Nor think what we are now.' Chorus 'Yet Brignall banks are fresh and fair, And Greta woods are green, And you may gather garlands there Would grace a summer queen.
Page 52 - Susan, Susan, lovely dear, My vows shall ever true remain ; Let me kiss off that falling tear ; We only part to meet again. Change as ye list, ye winds ; my heart shall be The faithful compass that still points to thee.
Page 47 - I clasp'd her to my bosom ! The golden hours, on angel wings, Flew o'er me and my dearie ; For dear to me, as light and life, Was my sweet Highland Mary. Wi' monie a vow and lock'd embrace, Our parting was fu...
Page 93 - And when, at last, thy Love shall die, Wilt thou receive his parting breath ? Wilt thou repress each struggling sigh ; And cheer with smiles the bed of death ? And wilt thou, o'er his...

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