The Scientist In The Crib: Minds, Brains, And How Children Learn (Google eBook)

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HarperCollins, Oct 13, 2009 - Family & Relationships - 304 pages
49 Reviews

This exciting book by three pioneers in the new field of cognitive science discusses important discoveries about how much babies and young children know and learn, and how much parents naturally teach them.It argues that evolution designed us both to teach and learn, and that the drive to learn is our most important instinct. It also reveals as fascinating insights about our adult capacities and how even young children -- as well as adults -- use some of the same methods that allow scientists to learn so much about the world. Filled with surprise at every turn, this vivid, lucid, and often funny book gives us a new view of the inner life of children and the mysteries of the mind.

  

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Review: The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind

User Review  - Lester French - Goodreads

An enlightening book about cognition and how children learn. Much of it references the groundbreaking research of Piaget. The take away for me is that children know much more than we credit them for ... Read full review

Review: The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind

User Review  - Joe Robles - Goodreads

I first read this book when it originally came out and decided to reread it as a refresher on child development (lots of my friends have kids). It was as informative as I remember. This is truly the ... Read full review

Contents

Ancient Questions and a Young
1
What Children Learn About People
23
What Children Learn About Things
60
What Children Learn About
92
What Scientists Have Learned About
133
What Scientists Have Learned About
174
Trailing Clouds of Glory
198
Notes
213
References
227
Index
265
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Alison Gopnik, Ph.D. is a professor of psychology at the University of California at Berkeley and a leading cognitive scientist. She is past president of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology and is the author of more than seventy papers on philosophy, psychology, and children's early learning. She has also written for The New York Review of Books and The Times Literary Supplement. Mother of three, she lives with her family in Berkeley, California.

Andrew N. Meltzoff, Ph.D. revolutionized the field of child psychology with his discoveries about how much infants know, learn, and remember. He is a professor of psychology and the University of Washington, and his research has been featured in Time, The New York Times, and museum exhibits worldwide. He and his wife, Dr. Kuhl, live with their daughter in Seattle, Washington.

Patricia K. Kuhl, Ph.D. is the world's leading authority on speech development and is a professor of speech and hearing at the University of Washington. She was one of six scientists invited to present their research at the White House Conference on Early Learning and the Brain in 1997. Her recent findings on language acquisition and why parents speak "motherese" to their children made national headlines. She and her husband, Dr. Meltzoff, live in Seattle.

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