THE LIFE, CRIME, AND CAPTURE OF JOHN WILKES BOOTH, WITH A FULL SKETCH OF THE CONSPIRACY OF WHICH HE WAS LEADER, AND THE PURSUIT, TRIAL AND EXECUTION OF HIS ACCOMLICES (Google eBook)

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1886
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Contents

I
5
II
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IV
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VI
39
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VIII
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Page 23 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Page 25 - I have also studied hard to discover upon what grounds the right of a State to secede has been denied, when our very name, United States, and the Declaration of Independence, both provide for Secession. But there is no time for words. I write in haste. I know how foolish I shall be deemed for undertaking such a step as this...
Page 66 - CHAINED in the market-place he stood, A man of giant frame, Amid the gathering multitude That shrunk to hear his name All stern of look and strong of limb, His dark eye on the ground : And silently they gazed on him, As on a lion bound.
Page 37 - It was at a man's height when the struggle of death twitched and lingered in the fading bravo's face. His jaw drew spasmodically and obliquely downward ; his eyeballs rolled toward his feet, and began to swell; lividness, like a horrible shadow, fastened upon him, and with a sort of gurgle and sudden che.ck, he stretched his feet and threw his head back and gave up the ghost. They sewed him up in a saddle-blanket.
Page 36 - His eyes were lustrous like fever, and swelled and rolled in terrible anxiety, while his teeth were fixed, and he wore the expression of one in the calmness before frenzy. In. vain he peered with vengeance in his look; the blaze that made him visible concealed his enemy. A second he turned glaring at the fire, as if to leap...
Page 36 - ... him visible concealed his enemy. A second he turned glaring at the fire, as if to leap upon it and extinguish it, but it had made such headway that this was a futile impulse, and he dismissed it. As calmly as upon the battle-field a veteran stands, amidst the hail of ball, and shell, and plunging iron, Booth turned at a man's stride and pushed for the door, carbine in poise, and the last resolve of death, which we name despair, sat on his high, bloodless forehead.
Page 35 - What thronging memories it brought to Booth we can only guess. In this little interval he made the resolve to die. But he was cool and steady to the end. Baker, after a lapse, hailed for the last time : " Well, we have waited long enough ; surrender your arms and come out, or we'll fire the barn.
Page 25 - Right or wrong, God judge me, not man. For be my motive good or bad, of one thing I am sure the lasting condemnation of the North. " I love peace more than life.. Have loved the Union beyond expression. For four years have I waited, hoped, and prayed for the dark clouds to break, and for a restoration of our former sunshine. To wait longer would be a crime. All hope for peace is dead. My prayers have proved as idle as my hopes. God's will be done. I go to see and share the bitter end. " I have ever...
Page 55 - O'Bierne was enabled to confer with Major "Wait, of the Eighth Illinois. The major had pushed on, on Monday night, to Leonardstown, and pretty well overhauled that locality. It was at this time that preparations were made to hunt the swamps around Chapmantown, Bethtown, and Allen's Fresh. Booth had been entirely lost since his departure from Mudd's house, and it was believed that he had either pushed on for the Potomac or taken to the swamps. The officers sagaciously determined to follow him to the...
Page 25 - I have many friends, and everything to make me happy; where my profession alone has gained me an income of more than twenty thousand dollars a year; and where my great personal ambition in my profession has such a great field for labor. On the other hand, the South...

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