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Books Books 1 - 10 of 20 on ... an interest, which is not merely that of the physical knowledge of things, but....  
" ... an interest, which is not merely that of the physical knowledge of things, but is connected with another order of ideas and sentiments. "
Magazine of Botany and Gardening British and Foreign: Comprehending Figures ... - Page 120
by James Burnett - 1836
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Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of the ..., Volume 4

Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland - Natural history - 1819
...how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances ; and without that nourishing juice, which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of com, the object of religious veneration among...
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The Quarterly review, Volume 21

1819
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances; and without that nourishing juice, which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, the object of religious veneration among...
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Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of the ..., Volume 4

Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland - Natural history - 1819
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances; and without that nourishing juice, which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of com, the object of religious veneration among...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 21

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero Baron Ernle, George Walter Prothero - Literature, Modern - 1819
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances; and without that nourishing juice, which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, the object of religious veneration among...
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The parlour portfolio, or, Post-chase companion: being a selection of the ...

Anecdotes - 1820
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances, and without that nourishing juice which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, the object of religious veneration among...
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Colombia: Being a Geographical, Statistical, Agricultural ..., Volume 1

Alexander Walker - Colombia - 1822
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances ; and without that nourishing juice which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, the object of religious veneration among...
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Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of the ..., Volume 4

Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland - Natural history - 1825
...how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances ; and without that nourishing juice, which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of com, the object of religious veneration among...
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The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Volume 12

Science - 1825
...a mother, which is intended for the long weakness of infancy. The starchy nature of grains, — an object of religious veneration among so many ancient and modern nations, is disseminated in the seeds, and deposited in the roots of vegetables ; milk appears exclusively to be...
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The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge, Volume 2

Language Arts & Disciplines - 1832
...conceive how the human race could exist without farinaceous substances, and without that nourishing juice which the breast of the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the long feebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, the object of religious veneration among...
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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Volume 21

Reuben Percy, John Timbs - Literary Criticism - 1833
...physical knowledge of things, but which connects itself with another order of ideas and feelings. We can hardly imagine how the human species could exist without,...religious veneration among so many ancient and modern nations,—is distributed in the seeds, and deposited in the roots of vegetables; while the milk which...
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