Renaissance essays, Volume 1985, Part 2

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Secker & Warburg, Jul 1, 1985 - History - 312 pages
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Review: Renaissance Essays

User Review  - James - Goodreads

Both enlightening and enjoyable, with the chapter on Paracelsus particularly amazing. Trevor-Roper sums up the period very well through a handful of essays, and allows the reader to enter the period's mindset and zoom in closely on Renaissance Europe. Read full review

Contents

The Doge Francesco Foscari
1
The Emperor Maximilian I as patron of the arts
13
Sir Thomas More and Utopia
24
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper was born at Glanton, in Northumberland, England in 1914, the son of a country doctor. Trevor-Roper won scholarships, first to Charterhouse, then to Christ Church, Oxford, where he won the Craven, Hertford and Ireland prizes. He took a double-first at Oxford, and soon afterwards he published a study of Archbishop Laud. During the Second World War Trevor-Roper worked in British intelligence; in 1945 he was assigned by his superiors to write a report on the death of Hitler, which became The Last Days of Hitler. After the war, in 1946, Trevor-Roper returned to Oxford as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, where he was a history tutor until 1957, and Censor (dean) from 1947 to 1952. In 1957 he was made Regius Professor of Modern History at the university from 1957 to 1980. In 1979 Margaret Thatcher created Trevor-Roper a life peer as Lord Dacre of Glanton. He was then Master of Peterhouse College, Cambridge from 1980 to 1987, and became an honorary fellow in 1987, when he retired Trevor-Roper was a prolific writer whose topics ranged from medieval to contemporary history. He died in January of 2003 at the age of 89.

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