A view of nature, in letters to a traveller among the Alps: With reflections on atheistical philosophy, now exemplified in France, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Printed for T. Becket, 1794 - Natural theology
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 218 - The fathers shall not be put to death for the children, neither shall the children be put to death for the fathers: every man shall be put to death for his own sin.
Page 218 - The soul that sinneth, it shall die. The son shall not bear the iniquity of the father, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son: the righteousness of the righteous shall be upon him, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon him.
Page 22 - ... people, if we compared the unrelenting revenge of Severus with the generous clemency of Fingal; the timid and brutal cruelty of Caracalla with the bravery, the tenderness, the elegant genius of Ossian; the mercenary chiefs, who, from motives of fear or interest, served under the imperial standard, with the free-born warriors who started to arms at the voice of the king of Morven; if, in a word, we contemplated the untutored Caledonians, glowing with the warm virtues of nature, and the degenerate...
Page 258 - And the Lord said unto Moses, Write this for a memorial in a book, and rehearse it in the ears of Joshua : for I will utterly put out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.
Page 339 - A being of the nature of man, endowed with the same faculties, but with a longer measure of existence, would cast down a smile of pity and contempt on the crimes and follies of human ambition, so eager, in a narrow span, to grasp at a precarious and short-lived enjoyment. It is thus that the experience of history exalts and enlarges the horizon of our intellectual view. In a composition of some days, in a perusal of some hours...
Page 330 - And he brought forth the people that were therein, and put them under saws, and under harrows of iron, and under axes of iron, and made them pass through the brickkiln : and thus did he unto all the cities of the children of Ammon.
Page 212 - impatient' to be on the wing, a weapon 'thirsts' to drink the blood of an enemy, and the like; yet his expression is never too big for the sense, but justly great in proportion to it.
Page 170 - The ancient Icelandic mythology calls him " the author of every thing that existeth; the eternal, the ancient, the living and awful Being, the searcher into concealed things, the Being that never changeth.
Page 148 - Ullin, Fingal's bard, was there ; the sweet voice of the hill of Cona. He praised the daughter of snow, and Morven's" high-descended chief. The daughter of snow overheard, and left the hall of her secret sigh. She came in all her beauty, like the moon from the cloud of the east. Loveliness was around her as light. Her steps were like the music of songs.
Page 181 - In the day-spring of the ages," says the prophetess, " there was neither sea, nor shore, nor refreshing breezes. There was neither earth below, nor heaven above, to be distinguished. The whole was only one vast abyss, without herb, and without seeds. The sun had then no palace : the stars knew not their dwellingplaces, the moon was ignorant of her power.

Bibliographic information