Indian year-book, compiled by J. Murdoch (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Murdoch
1862
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Page 142 - Council is of opinion that the great object of the British Government ought to be the promotion of European literature and science among the natives of India, and that all the funds appropriated for the purpose of education would be best employed on English education alone.
Page 206 - Not that which goeth into the mouth, defileth a man : but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man.
Page 213 - Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity.
Page 141 - ... a sum of not less than one lakh of rupees in each year shall be set apart and applied to the revival and improvement of literature, and the encouragement of the learned natives of India, and for the introduction and promotion of a knowledge of the sciences among the inhabitants of the British territories in India...
Page 220 - Even so hath the Lord ordained that they which preach the gospel should live of the gospel.
Page 18 - Now, if there be a fact to which all experience testifies, it is that when a country holds another in subjection, the individuals of the ruling people who resort to the foreign country to make their fortunes are of all others those who most need to be held under powerful restraint. They are always one of the chief difficulties of the government. Armed with the prestige and filled with the scornful overbearingness of the conquering nation, they have the feelings inspired by absolute power without...
Page 18 - Wherever the demoralising effect of the situation is not in a most remarkable degree corrected by the personal character of the individual, they think the people of the country mere dirt under their feet ; it seems to them monstrous that any rights of the natives should stand in the way of their smallest pretensions...
Page 156 - The consideration of the impossibility of Government alone doing all that must be done in order to provide adequate means for the education of the Natives of India...
Page 4 - It is not by attempting to rule directly a country like India, but by giving it good rulers, that the English people can do their duty to that country...
Page 55 - The popular harangue, the tart reply, The logic, and the wisdom, and the wit, And the loud laugh I long to know them all ; I burn to set the imprison'd wranglers free.

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