Jung on Synchronicity and the Paranormal

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Psychology Press, 1997 - Psychology - 177 pages
2 Reviews
Jung's lifelong interest in the paranormal contributed significantly to the development of his influential but controversial theory of synchronicity. In this volume Roderick Main brings together a selection of Jung's writings on topics from well-known and less accessible sources to explore the close relationship between them.
In a searching introduction he addresses all the main aspects of synchronicity and clarifies the confusions and difficulties commonly experienced by readers interested in achieving a real understanding of what Jung had to say.
This book provides an excellent companion to Jung's Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle (Routledge) and reveals the full extent and range of Jung's researches into a range of psychic phenomena which are still not yet adequately explained.
  

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Contents

IV
46
V
54
VI
71
VII
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VIII
89
IX
90
X
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XI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XV
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XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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Page 25 - The philosophical principle that underlies our conception of natural law is causality. But if the connection between cause and effect turns out to be only statistically valid and only relatively true, then the causal principle is only of relative use for explaining natural processes and therefore presupposes the existence of one or more other factors which would be necessary for an explanation.

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About the author (1997)

Carl Gustav Jung was born in Switzerland on July 26, 1875. He originally set out to study archaeology, but switched to medicine and began practicing psychiatry in Basel after receiving his degree from the University of Basel in 1902. He became one of the most famous of modern psychologists and psychiatrists. Jung first met Sigmund Freud in 1907 when he became his foremost associate and disciple. The break came with the publication of Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious (1912), which did not follow Freud's theories of the libido and the unconscious. Jung eventually rejected Freud's system of psychoanalysis for his own "analytic psychology." This emphasizes present conflicts rather than those from childhood; it also takes into account the conflict arising from what Jung called the "collective unconscious"---evolutionary and cultural factors determining individual development. Jung invented the association word test and contributed the word complex to psychology, and first described the "introvert" and "extrovert" types. His interest in the human psyche, past and present, led him to study mythology, alchemy, oriental religions and philosophies, and traditional peoples. Later he became interested in parapsychology and the occult. He thought that unidentified flying objects (UFOs) might be a psychological projection of modern people's anxieties. He wrote several books including Studies in Word Association, Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies, and Psychology and Alchemy. He died on June 6, 1961 after a short illness.

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