Questions and Exercises for Classical Scholarships, Second Division ... (Google eBook)

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J. Thornton, 1879 - 132 pages
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Page 79 - Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious. For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, TO THE UNKNOWN GOD. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you.
Page 52 - Could trammel up' the consequence, and catch, With his surcease,* success ; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, . But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come. But, in these cases, We still have judgment here ; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor : This even-handed justice Commends11 the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips.
Page 75 - Surely every medicine is an innovation, and he that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils; for time is the greatest innovator; and if time of course alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Page 2 - For as water will not ascend higher than the level of the first springhead from whence it descendeth, so knowledge derived from Aristotle, and exempted from liberty of examination, will not rise again higher than the knowledge of Aristotle.
Page 33 - In which methodical course, it is so supposed they must proceed by the steady pace of learning onward, as at convenient times for memory's sake to retire back into the middle ward, and sometimes into the rear of what they have been taught, until they have confirmed and solidly united the whole body of their perfected knowledge, like the last embattling of a Roman legion.
Page 130 - When a Mammonite mother kills her babe for a burial fee, And Timour-Mammon grins on a pile of children's bones, Is it peace or war ? better, war! loud war by land and by sea, War with a thousand battles, and shaking a hundred thrones.
Page 63 - The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality ; Another race hath been, and other palms are won.
Page 63 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. 'But not the praise...
Page 74 - As the births of living creatures at first are illshapen, so are all innovations, which are the births of time.
Page 16 - The battle of Marathon, even as an event in English history, is more important than the battle of Hastings. If the issue of that day had been different, the Britons and the Saxons might still have been wandering in the woods.

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