A History of Indiana from Its Exploration to 1850, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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W.K. Stewart Company, 1915 - Indiana - 515 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
28
III
47
IV
70
V
92
VI
126
VII
154
VIII
181
XII
279
XIII
296
XIV
323
XV
340
XVI
352
XVII
394
XVIII
418
XIX
438

IX
203
X
222
XI
254

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Page 264 - The navigable waters leading into the Mississippi and St. Lawrence, and the carrying places between the same, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said territory, as to the citizens of the United States, and those of any other states that may be admitted into the confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
Page 220 - It shall be the duty of the general assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation from township schools to a state university, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 441 - Each company will consist of one Captain, one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, four Sergeants, four Corporals, two Musicians, and sixty-four Privates.
Page 39 - The French have a great influence over these Indians, and never fail in telling them many lies to the prejudice of his majesty's interest, by making the English nation odious and hateful to them. I had the greatest difficulties in removing these prejudices. As these Indians are a weak, foolish, and credulous people, they are easily imposed on by a designing people, who have led them hitherto as they pleased. The French told...
Page 393 - No law or resolution shall ever be passed by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana that shall recognize any liability of this State to pay or redeem any certificate of stock issued in pursuance of an act entitled "An act to provide for the funded debt of the State of Indiana, and for the completion of the Wabash and Erie Canal to Evansville...
Page 4 - It did not take him long to make up his mind that here was a chance to serve his nation and also himself.
Page 308 - State. Jackson's heaviest vote came from the triangle between Indianapolis, Madison, and Evansville.24 This was, and still is, a center of Jacksonian Democracy in Indiana. One of the sharpest political struggles that had taken place in the State up to the time took place in the General Assembly of 1832. The veto of the bill rechartering the Second Bank of the United States made it imperative that some form of currency be provided for the citizens of Indiana.
Page 413 - But these weaknesses do not account for its quick and ruinous collapse. Had an efficient auditor administered the law and enforced it rigidly, such banks as that of Newport could not have been organized. The chief defect lay, not in the law, but in the officials who failed to enforce it. 76 BANK OF THE STATE OF INDIANA THE THIRD STATE BANK, 1855-1865 THE bill to charter a new State bank to be known as the Bank of the State of Indiana had a career in si Senate Journal, 1855, 17, the governor's...
Page 254 - ... interior ; one by Salem, Bono, Bedford, and Bloomington to the Wabash at Lafayette; the other led by Greenville, Fredericksburg, Paoli, Mt. Pleasant, and Maysville to the Wabash at Vincennes. One can scarcely realize the condition of travel in 1825. There was no railroad, no canal, no pike. All the rivers except the Ohio were obstructed by fallen trees, ripples, and bars. Two main roads led to Indianapolis, one from Madison, the other from Centerville. The transportation service, if any was to...
Page 447 - Indiana regiment, which had fallen back as stated, could not be rallied, and took no further part in the action, except a handful of men, who, under its gallant Colonel Bowles, joined the Mississippi regiment, and did good service; and those fugitives who, at a later period in the day, assisted in defending the train and depot at Buena Vista.

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