Papers relative to the discussion with France in 1802 and 1803 (Google eBook)

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1803
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Page 108 - ... considerable degree of agitation should prevail, but this, like the swell after a storm, -would gradually subside if not kept up by the policy of either party; that I would not pretend to pronounce which had been the aggressor in the paper war of which he complained, and which was still kept up, though with this difference, that in England it was independent of Government, and in France its very act and deed.
Page 391 - Channel and the North Seas, as far as the Canary Islands inclusively, whether in the Ocean, or in the Mediterranean: two months from the said Canary Islands...
Page 395 - Majesty, and bring away their effects, as well as their persons, without being restrained in their emigration, under any pretence whatsoever except that of debts or of criminal prosecutions : the term limited for this emigration shall be fixed to the space of eighteen months, to be computed from the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty.
Page 308 - Awocato read over his letter as if to himself, but yet sufficiently loud to allow Barnaby to learn the contents, sealed it, addressed it, and then consigned it to the messenger from Ibella, with directions to deliver it into the hands of the principal of the seminary, with Awocato Stella's...
Page 421 - Castile have been separated from. • the order by Spain, a part of the Italian langue has been abolished by the annexation of Piedmont and Parma to France. There is strong reason to believe, that it has been in contemplation to sequestrate the property of the Bavarian langue, and the intention has been avowed of keeping the Russian langues within the dominions of the emperor. " Under these circumstances, the order of St.
Page 416 - ... may be considered as operating virtually as a breach of the treaty itself, and as giving the party aggrieved a right to demand satisfaction or compensation for any substantial difference which such aCts may have effected in their relative situations ; but. whatever may be the principle on which...
Page 281 - I have received his Majesty's commands to express to you the pleasure with which his Majesty has received this intelligence, and to add that his Majesty regards the care which has been taken so to frame this Treaty...
Page 426 - Republic, to require the publication of it by order of his Government in the Gazette of the Senate of that town. ' ' With this requisition so made, the Senate of Hamburgh were induced to comply ; and thus has the independence of that town been violated, and a free state made the instrument, by the menace of the French Government, of propagating throughout Europe, upon their authority, the most offensive and unfounded calumnies against His Majesty and his Government. His Majesty might add to this...
Page 42 - That our Government neither has nor wants any other protection than what the laws of the country .afford ; and though they are willing and ready to give to every foreign government all the protection against offences of this nature which the principle of their laws and constitution will admit, they never can consent to new-model their laws, or to change their constitution, to gratify the wishes of any foreign power.
Page 197 - I asked him whether he thought that such a cooduct would add to the glory of the first consul, or whether the falling on the innocent and defenceless would not rather tarnish it, -and ultimately unite against him, not only the honest men in his own country, but every government in Europe. — That it certainly would excite more detestation than terror in England, at the same time that it would serve to impress upon us still more strongly the necessity of omitting no means of circumscribing a power...

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