Chemistry of Aluminium, Gallium, Indium, and Thallium

Front Cover
A.J. Downs
Springer Science & Business Media, May 31, 1993 - Science - 526 pages
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Boron has all the best tunes. That may well be the first impression of the Group 13 elements. The chemical literature fosters the impression not only in the primary journals, but also in asteady outflowofbooks focussing more or less closely on boron and its compounds. The same preoccupation with boron is apparent in the coverage received by the Group 13 elements in the comprehensive and regularly updated volume of the Gmelin Handbook. Yet such an imbalance cannot be explained by any inherent lack ofvariety, interest or consequence in the 'heavier elements. Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust; in the industrialised world the metal is second only to iron in its usage, and its compounds can justifiably be said to touch our lives daily - to the potential detriment of those and other lives, some would argue. From being chemical curios, gallium and indium have now gained considerably prominence as sources of compound semiconductors like gallium arsenide and indium antimonide. Nor is there any want ofincident in the chemistriesofthe heavier Group 13 elements. In their redox, coordination and structural properties, there is to be found music indeed, notable not always for its harmony but invariably for its richness and variety. Thisbook seeks to redress the balance with a definitive, wide-rangingand up-to-date review of the chemistry of the Group 13 metals aluminium, gallium, indium and thallium.
  

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Contents

I
1
III
14
IV
16
V
19
VII
35
VIII
39
X
46
XI
49
C
323
CI
324
CII
328
CIII
332
CIV
342
CV
349
CVI
351
CVII
356

XII
65
XIII
70
XIV
72
XV
81
XVII
83
XVIII
84
XX
85
XXI
87
XXII
88
XXIII
89
XXIV
90
XXV
91
XXVI
92
XXVII
93
XXVIII
95
XXIX
98
XXX
100
XXXI
103
XXXII
105
XXXIII
106
XXXIV
108
XXXV
109
XXXVI
111
XXXVIII
118
XXXIX
128
XL
138
XLI
161
XLII
181
XLIII
190
XLIV
191
XLV
195
XLVI
198
XLVII
207
XLVIII
211
XLIX
215
L
216
LI
217
LII
230
LIII
248
LV
249
LVIII
252
LIX
253
LX
257
LXI
266
LXII
280
LXIII
281
LXIV
282
LXV
284
LXVI
285
LXIX
286
LXXII
287
LXXIV
288
LXXVI
292
LXXVIII
296
LXXIX
299
LXXX
301
LXXXII
302
LXXXIII
303
LXXXIV
306
LXXXVI
309
LXXXVII
311
LXXXVIII
313
XC
314
XCI
316
XCII
317
XCIV
318
XCV
319
XCVII
320
XCVIII
322
CVIII
357
CIX
360
CX
363
CXI
364
CXII
365
CXIII
366
CXIV
372
CXVI
373
CXVII
395
CXVIII
398
CXIX
403
CXX
404
CXXI
408
CXXII
409
CXXIII
412
CXXIV
416
CXXV
419
CXXVI
422
CXXVII
430
CXXIX
432
CXXX
433
CXXXII
434
CXXXIII
439
CXXXIV
441
CXXXV
443
CXXXVI
447
CXXXVII
449
CXXXVIII
450
CXXXIX
451
CXL
452
CXLI
453
CXLII
454
CXLIII
456
CXLV
457
CXLVI
458
CXLVII
459
CXLVIII
460
CL
462
CLII
464
CLIII
465
CLV
466
CLVI
467
CLVII
468
CLVIII
469
CLIX
470
CLX
474
CLXII
475
CLXIV
476
CLXV
477
CLXVIII
478
CLXIX
479
CLXX
481
CLXXI
483
CLXXIII
484
CLXXIV
485
CLXXVI
487
CLXXVIII
488
CLXXX
491
CLXXXIII
492
CLXXXIV
496
CLXXXVII
497
CLXXXVIII
499
CXC
500
CXCII
502
CXCIII
503
CXCV
507
CXCVI
511
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Page 507 - WF Hillebrand, GEF Lundell, HA Bright, and JI Hoffman, Applied Inorganic Analysis, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1953, pp.

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