A Sketch of the Natural History of the District of Columbia Together with an Indexed Edition of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1917 Map of Washington and Vicinity (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Press of H.L. & J.B. McQueen, Incorporated, 1918 - Natural history - 142 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - ... pheasants, woodcocks, and partridges are in the greatest abundance. In the marshes are found soruses, a particular species of bird, more exquisitely delicious than the ortolan; snipes also, and ducks of various kinds. The American shell-drake and blue-wing exceed all of the duck kind whatsoever; and these are in prodigious numbers. In the woods there are variety of birds remarkable both for singing and for beauty; of which are the mocking-bird, the red-bird or nightingale, the blue-bird, the...
Page 18 - ... indirectly, certain published records of its work on the flora of the District. The first of these bore on its title page the following: " Florula Columbiensis: or a list of plants found in the District of Columbia; arranged according to the Linnaean system, under their respective classes and orders, &c., and exhibiting their generally received common names, and time of flowering, during the years 1817 and 1818. Washington: printed for the Washington Botanical Society by Jacob Gideon, Jun., 1819.
Page 9 - Falls, which are to be seen most to advantage from the Virginia side is scarcely to be equalled. There is a stupendous projecting rock covered with cedar, where one may sit and gaze at the waters dashing with impetuosity over the rugged surface. At the close of winter vast masses of ice, rolling over the rocks with hideous crash, present a scene truly sublime.
Page 18 - Florae columbianae prodromus, exhibens enumerationem plantarum quae hactenus exploratae sunt; or A prodromus of the Flora columbiana, exhibiting a list of all the plants which have as yet been collected.
Page 72 - It is known to students of modern manufactures as the fall-line because along it the rivers descend as abruptly as the land; and it is even more notable as a line of deflection than as one of declivity in rivers. The great waterways of the Middle Atlantic slope maintain their courses through Appalachian ranges and Piedmont hills alike; but on reaching the coastal lowlands they are turned aside literally by a sand bank little higher than their depth, and thence hug the upland margin for scores of...
Page 72 - ... and excellent mill sites, easy ferriage and practicable bridge sites ; here the pioneer settlements and towns were located; and across the necks of the inter-estuarine peninsulas the pioneer routes of travel were extended from settlement to settlement until the entire Atlantic Slope was traversed by a grand social and commercial artery stretching from New England to the Gulf States. As the population grew and spread, the settlements, villages, and towns along this line of Nature's selection waxed,...
Page 116 - MAPS of the District of Columbia and City of Washington and Plats of the Squares and Lots of the City of Washington.
Page 13 - Jonathan Elliot, Historical Sketches of the Ten Miles Square Forming the District of Columbia; with a Picture of Washington, Describing Objects of General Interest or Curiosity at the Metropolis of the Union (Washington, DC, 1830), 165. After its establishment in 1824 the terms "Bureau" and "Office" were used almost interchangeably to describe HERMAN J.
Page 72 - Atlantic slope was traversed by a grand social and commercial artery stretching from New England to the Gulf States. As the population grew and spread, the settlements, villages, and towns along the line of Nature's selection waxed, and many of them yet retain their early prestige ; and the early stage-route has become a great metropolitan railway and telegraph route connecting North and South as they were connected of old in more primitive fashion. And just as these natural conditions influenced...
Page 72 - ... aside literally by a sand bank little higher than their depth, and thence hug the upland margin for scores of miles before finally finding their way into the ocean. So the coastal lowlands are nearly isolated by the tidal bays and river-elbows along their inner margin. Measured along the fall-line, the Hudson is barred from the Rappahannock, 300 miles southward, by only 60 miles of land and unnavigable water. This remarkable physiography is now and ever has been reflected in the culture of the...

Bibliographic information