Seven years at Eton, 1857-1864, ed. [or rather written] by J. Brinsley-Richards (Google eBook)

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1883
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Page 72 - Neville was uiibracing his nether garments next moment, when he knelt on the step of the block, and when the Lower master inflicted upon his person six cuts that sounded like the splashings of so many buckets of water, I turned almost faint. I felt as I have never felt but once since, and that was when seeing a man hanged. It is quite true that the eyes and nerves soon get accustomed to cruel sights. I gradually came to witness the execution in the Lower School not only with indifference, but...
Page 420 - Shade of him whose valiant tongue On high the song of freedom sung ; Shade of him, whose mighty soul Would pay no taxes on his poll ; Though, swift as lightning, civic sword Descended on thy fated head, The blood of England's boldest poured, And numbered Tyler with the dead ! Still may thy spirit flap its wings At midnight o'er the couch of kings ; And peer and prelate tremble, too, In dread of nightly interview ! With patriot gesture of command, With eyes that like thy forges gleam, Lest Tyler's...
Page 389 - ... the three brothers at the door of the Christopher Inn, they had not far to go to reach their boarding-house, which was just over the way. It was kept by a dame, Mrs. Shurey, and, by reason of its vicinity to the famous inn, was looked upon by the boys as most eligibly situated. It was, however, the worst of all houses for study ; and it doubles the merit of Gladstone's achievements at Eton that he should have been able to work in such a place. To the Christopher came many times a day coaches...
Page 73 - ... was a marvellous invention. Fellows were allowed to boat on the river, but all the approaches to it were out of bounds ; we might walk on the terrace of Windsor Castle, but it was unlawful to be caught in the streets of Windsor which led to the terrace...
Page 141 - Croppie, who abominated all laws, and delighted in transgressions, resolved to go to the Fair ; and without difficulty he persuaded the Pug and me to join him. One day after twelve the three of us passed over Windsor Bridge in the same condition as the "bold adventurers...
Page 419 - Ode to the Shade of Wat Tyler ' : Shade of him whose valiant tongue On high the song of freedom sung ; Shade of him, whose mighty soul Would pay no taxes on his poll ; Though, swift as lightning, civic sword Descended on thy fated head, The blood of England's boldest...
Page 421 - Keate did not utter a word of censure on the poem ; and one may compare this placid indifference with the action which Dr. Hornby recently took in respect of Mr. James Leigh Joynes's little book, ' A Tourist in Ireland.' Possibly, however, Gladstone was making allusion to the effect which his "Ode" produced in different quarters when he wrote in " B. Bouverie's Diary, ' Vol. ii., No. 9 : " October 20. I inquired into my own character. I found myself according to the reports of my various respondents...
Page 408 - Gladstone gave great offence by remarking that the boys who were foremost in this kind of butchery were the first to quake at the consequences of detection, and he dared them, if they were proud of their work, to sport the trophies of it in their hats. On the following Ash Wednesday he found three newly-amputated pigtails hung in a bunch on his door, with a paper bearing this inscription : " Quisquis amat porcos, porcis et amabitur illis ; Cauda sit exemplum ter repetita tibi.
Page 420 - I hymn the gallant and the good From Tyler down to Thistlewood ; My Muse the trophies grateful sings, The deeds of Miller and of Ings, She sings of all who soon or late Have burst Subjection's iron chain, Have seal'd the bloody despot's fate, Or cleft a peer or priest in twain...
Page 321 - The invites attended in an upper room of Tap after two, and each before the long glass was handed to him had a napkin tied round his neck. It was considered a grand thing to drain the glass without removing it from the lips, and without spilling any of its contents. This was difficult, because when the contents of the tubular portion of the glass had been sucked down, the beer in the globe would remain for a moment as if congealed there ; then...

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