Orion, an epic poem (Google eBook)

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Page 1 - Ye rocky heights of Chios, where the snow, Lit by the far-off and receding moon, Now feels the soft dawn's purpling twilight creep Over your ridges, while the mystic dews Swarm down and wait to be instinct with gold And solar fire ! — ye mountains waving brown With thick-winged woods, and blotted with deep caves In secret places ; and ye paths that stray E'en as ye list ; what odours and what sighs Tend your sweet silence through the star-showered night...
Page 102 - The pale-gold platform of the Morning came Towards the gliding mount. Against a sky Of delicate purple, snow-bright courts and halls, Touched with light silvery green, gleaming across, Fronted by pillars vast, cloud-capitalled, With shafts of changeful pearl, all reared upon An isle of clear aerial gold, came floating ; And in the centre, clad in fleecy white, With lucid lilies in her golden hair, Eos, sweet Goddess of the Morning, stood.
Page 124 - Artemis' hand, his own. So fares it ever With the world's builder. He, from wall to beam, From pillar to roof, from shade to corporal form ; From the first vague Thought to the Temple vast, A ceaseless contest with the crowd endures, For whom he labours. Why then should we move ? Our wisdom cannot change...
Page 106 - Bright were his eyes. With re-awakened love, and sight enlarged For all things beautiful, and nobly true To the great elements that rule the world, Orion's mind, left to itself, reviewed Past knowledge, and of wisdom saw the fruit Far nearer than before, the path less rough, The true possession not austere and cold, But natural in its strength and balance just Of body and of soul ; each to respect, And to the other minister, and both Their one harmonious being to employ For general happiness, and...
Page 92 - My son, why wouldst thou ever work and build And so bestir thyself, when certain grief, Mischief, or error, and not seldom death, Follows on all that individual will Can of itself attain. I told thee this ; Nor for reproach repeat it, but to soothe Thy mind with consciousness that not in thee Was failure born. Its law preceded thine : It governs every act, which needs must fail — I mean, give place — to make room for the next. Each thinks he fails, because he thinks himself A chain and centre,...
Page 79 - Throughout the day unceasingly it drinks, While ever and anon the nightingale, Not waiting for the evening, swells his hymn — His one sustained and...
Page 66 - Sing on ! Sing on, great tempest ! in the darkness sing ! Thy madness is a music that brings calm Into my central soul ; and from its waves, That now with joy begin to heave and gush...
Page 87 - ... in the world ; An age of thought ; lastly, an age of both, When thought guides action and men know themselves, What they would have, and how to compass it. Yet are not these great periods so distinct Each from the other, — or from all the rest Of intermediate degrees and powers, Cut off, — but that strong links of nature run Throughout, and prove one central heart, wherein Time beats twin-pulses with Humanity. In every age an emblem and a type, Premature, single, ending with itself, Of...
Page 95 - Methinks it must betoken good ; Some help from Artemis, who may relent, And think of me as one she sought to lift To her own sphere of purity ; or, indeed, Some God may deem me worthy of a fate Better than that which locks up all design In pausing night. Perchance the dream may bode That Merope shall be to me restored, And I see nature through her death-deep eyes, And know the glorious mysteries of the grave, Which, through extremes of blissful passion's life, Methought I saw. Oh, wherefore am I...
Page 35 - O'er which they, like a bursting billow, fell. — then round the blaze, Their shadows brandishing afar and athwart, Over the level space and up the hills, Six giants held portentous dance. — his safe return To corporal sense, by shaking off these nets Of moonbeams from his soul.

References from web pages

From "Orion: An Epic Poem" by Richard Henry Horne. Edmund Clarence ...
Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. (1833–1908). A Victorian Anthology, 1837–1895. 1895. From “Orion: An Epic Poem”. Richard Henry Horne (1802–84) ...
www.bartleby.com/ 246/ 77.html

"An Old-World Radiance ": Roberts' Orion and Other Poems
As Horne makes clear in a preface written for the ninth edition (1872), Orion: An Epic Poem was designed as an allegory of progress: its hero is "resolved ...
www.uwo.ca/ english/ canadianpoetry/ cpjrn/ vol08/ early.htm

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