Monster of God: The Man-eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2003 - Nature - 515 pages
32 Reviews
The beasts that have always ruled our jungles and our nightmares are dying. What will become of us without them? For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. But by the year 2150 big predators may only exist on the other side of glass barriers and chain-link fences. Their gradual disappearance is changing the very nature of our existence. We no longer occupy an intermediate position on the food chain; instead we survey it invulnerably from aboveso far above that we are in danger of forgetting that we even belong to an ecosystem. Casting his expert eye over the rapidly diminishing areas of wilderness where predators still reign, the award-winning author of The Song of the Dodo examines the fate of lions in India's Gir forest, of saltwater crocodiles in northern Australia, of brown bears in the mountains of Romania, and of Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East. In the poignant and troublesome ferocity of these embattled creatures, we recognize something primeval deep within us, something in danger of vanishing forever. 8 maps.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
11
4 stars
14
3 stars
6
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind

User Review  - Melissa - Goodreads

David Quammen travels to four locales where traditional populations still live among large predators, including the Asiatic lion (did you know those still exist?), the saltwater crocodile, the brown ... Read full review

Review: Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind

User Review  - Dovie - Goodreads

The book is interesting but a bit dry and jumpy, making it difficult to follow. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
17
III
77
IV
125
V
209
VI
301
VII
331
VIII
399
IX
439
X
451
XI
481
XII
487
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Writer David Quammen grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio and was later educated at both Yale and Oxford Universities. Quammen began his career by writing for The Christian Science Monitor, the National Center for Appropriate Technology, and Audubon, Esquire, Rolling Stone, and Harpers Magazines. He wrote the novels The Soul of Viktor Tronko and The Song of the Dodo: Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinctions, which won the 1997 New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism. He also received two National Magazine Awards for his column "Natural Acts" in Outside magazine.

Bibliographic information