The Ribbajack: and Other Haunting Tales (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Aug 17, 2006 - Juvenile Fiction - 176 pages
16 Reviews
New York Times bestselling author Brian Jacques brings you six spine-tingling tales!

What if revenge were a monster of your own creation, and all you needed to summon it were enough hatred and enough imagination? Which of you would really be the monster? From vengeance monsters to haunted schools to the threat of a modern-day Medusa, New York Times bestselling author Brian Jacques spins six all-new tales of horror and suspense. Read on, but be careful. . . .
  

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Review: The Ribbajack: and Other Haunting Tales

User Review  - Jen - Goodreads

What a delicious romp through the imagination! Jacques never disappoints in this collection of short stories. From the titular "The Ribbajack" to the charming "Miggy Mags and the Malabar Sailor", I ... Read full review

Review: The Ribbajack: and Other Haunting Tales

User Review  - Sean - Goodreads

Mostly variations on familiar spookies: werewolves, ghosts, mermaids, etc. The Ribbajack is original, and as a story has a bit more dash to it and the characters a bit more life. Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15, 1939. After he finished St. John's School at the age of fifteen, he became a merchant seaman and travelled to numerous ports including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a police constable, a postmaster, and a stand-up comic. During the sixties, he was a member of the folk singing group The Liverpool Fishermen. He wrote both poetry and music, but he began his writing career in earnest as a playwright. His three stage plays Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, and Scouse have been performed at the Everyman Theatre. He wrote Redwall for the children at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool, where he delivered milk as a truck driver. His style of writing is very descriptive, because of the nature of his first audience, for whom he painted pictures with words, so that they could see them in their imaginations. After Alan Durband, his childhood English teacher, read Redwall, he showed it to a publisher without telling Jacques. This event led to a contract for the first five books in the Redwall series. He also wrote the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. He died on February 5, 2011.

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