God After Darwin: A Theology of Evolution (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Westview Press, 2009 - Philosophy - 304 pages
6 Reviews
In God After Darwin, eminent theologian John F. Haught argues that the ongoing debate between Darwinian evolutionists and Christian apologists is fundamentally misdirected: Both sides persist in focusing on an explanation of underlying design and order in the universe. Haught suggests that what is lacking in both of these competing ideologies is the notion of novelty, a necessary component of evolution and the essence of the unfolding of the divine mystery. He argues that Darwin’s disturbing picture of life, instead of being hostile to religion-as scientific skeptics and many believers have thought it to be-actually provides a most fertile setting for mature reflection on the idea of God. Solidly grounded in scholarship, Haught’s explanation of the relationship between theology and evolution is both accessible and engaging. The second edition of God After Darwin features an entirely new chapter on the ongoing, controversial debate between intelligent design and evolution, including an assessment of Haught’s experience as an expert witness in the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District on teaching evolution and intelligent design in schools.
  

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Review: God After Darwin 1E

User Review  - Nathan - Goodreads

Strong start to an actual integration of Darwinian Evolution and Christian Theology. Heavily based in the works of Moltmann and Whitehead. Read full review

Review: God After Darwin 1E

User Review  - Tom Uytterhoeven - Goodreads

It's good, it's refreshing, it certainly gives you some good ideas - but ultimately I'm not convinced process theology really helps us to move forward in the science-religion dialogue... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

BEYOND DESIGN
1
DARWINS DANGEROUS IDEA
13
THEOLOGY SINCE DARWIN
25
DARWINS GIFT TO THEOLOGY
49
RELIGION EVOLUTION AND INFORMATION
61
A GOD FOR EVOLUTION
87
EVOLUTION TRAGEDY AND COSMIC PURPOSE
113
RELIGION ETHICS AND EVOLUTION
129
EVOLUTION ECOLOGY AND THE PROMISE OF NATURE
153
COSMIC EVOLUTION AND DIVINE ACTION
173
DARWIN AND GOD AFTER DOVER
193
CONCLUSION
211
Acknowledgments
219
Notes
221
Index
239
Copyright

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Page 194 - Jefferson, the clause against establishment of religion by law was intended to erect "a wall of separation between church and State.
Page 194 - establishment of religion' clause . . . means at least this: Neither a state nor the Federal Government can set up a church. Neither can pass laws which aid one religion, aid all religions, or prefer one religion to another.
Page 160 - From first to last, and not merely in the epilogue, Christianity is eschatology, is hope, forward looking and forward moving, and therefore also revolutionizing and transforming the present.
Page 28 - Thus disbelief crept over me at a very slow rate, but was at last complete. The rate was so slow that I felt no distress, and have never since doubted even for a single second that my conclusion was correct.
Page 22 - The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.
Page 20 - It was Darwin's greatest accomplishment to show that the directive organization of living beings can be explained as the result of a natural process, natural selection, without any need to resort to a Creator or other external agent.
Page 231 - The pilgrim fathers of the scientific imagination as it exists to-day, are the great tragedians of ancient Athens, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides. Their vision of fate, remorseless and indifferent, urging a tragic incident to its inevitable issue, is the vision possessed by science. Fate in Greek Tragedy becomes the order of nature in modern thought.
Page 226 - The prevailing wisdom, variously expressed and argued for, is materialism: there is only one sort of stuff, namely matter — the physical stuff of physics, chemistry, and physiology — and the mind is somehow nothing but a physical phenomenon. According to the materialists, we can (in principle!) account for every mental phenomenon using the same physical principles, laws, and raw materials that suffice to explain radioactivity, continental drift, photosynthesis, reproduction, nutrition, and growth,...

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