Aeneid, Book 4

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, Jan 1, 1997 - Fiction - 399 pages
44 Reviews
This poem is the story of the hero Aeneas as he flees from Troy, and after many ordeals and suffering carves out a foothold for the future Romans in Italy. While defining and celebrating what it meant to be Roman, it confronts, with a bleak pathos, the tragedy involved in the destiny of Rome.
  

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And a ripping good yarn. - Goodreads
... i'm not so into the boring battle scenes, yay. - Goodreads
This is marked clearly in the final battle scenes. - Goodreads

Review: The Aeneid (Little Red Leaves Textile Series #34)

User Review  - Bet Roberts - Goodreads

Virgil's epic serves as a sequel to Homer's Iliad, chronicling the trials of Aeneas of Troy after it is defeated by the Achaeans. It's got all you could want in a classic epic: cool fight scenes ... Read full review

Review: The Aeneid (Little Red Leaves Textile Series #34)

User Review  - Mark Fabiano - Goodreads

I got into the 300s and just can't go on. Its too boring. I don't care at all about any of the characters, or the mythology. Borrowed so much from the Greeks that it would have been better not to ... Read full review

Contents

BOOK I
3
BOOK III
65
BOOK IV
93
BOOK V
123
BOOK VI
157
BOOK VII
193
BOOK VIII
225
BOOK IX
253
BOOK X
285
BOOK XI
323
BOOK XII
361
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Virgil was born on October 15, 70 B.C.E., in Northern Italy in a small village near Mantua. He attended school at Cremona and Mediolanum (Milan), then went to Rome, where he studied mathematics, medicine and rhetoric, and finally completed his studies in Naples. He entered literary circles as an "Alexandrian," the name given to a group of poets who sought inspiration in the sophisticated work of third-century Greek poets, also known as Alexandrians. In 49 BC Virgil became a Roman citizen. After his studies in Rome, Vergil is believed to have lived with his father for about 10 years, engaged in farm work, study, and writing poetry. After the battle of Philippi in 42 B.C.E. Virgil┐s property in Cisalpine Gaul, was confiscated for veterans. In the following years Virgil spent most of his time in Campania and Sicily, but he also had a house in Rome. During the reign of emperor Augustus, Virgil became a member of his court circle and was advanced by a minister, Maecenas, patron of the arts and close friend to the poet Horace. He gave Virgil a house near Naples. Between 42 and 37 B.C.E. Virgil composed pastoral poems known as Bucolic or Eclogues and spent years on the Georgics. The rest of his life, from 30 to 19 B.C., Virgil devoted to The Aeneid, the national epic of Rome, and the glory of the Empire. Although ambitious, Virgil was never really happy about the task. Virgil died in 19 B. C.

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