Essays: Philosophical, Historical & Literary, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Moore, 1791
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Page 25 - This opinion however, not availing in oppofition to that of the majority of the Bench, the prifoners were remanded ; in confequence of which, they moved for a writ of error, to bring the matter before the Lords. As this, agreeably...
Page 192 - The effect of liberty to individuals is that they may do what they please: we ought to see what it will please them to do, before we risk congratulations, which may be soon turned into complaints.
Page 158 - X. No man ought to be molested on account of his opinions, not even on account of his religious opinions, provided his avowal of them does not disturb the public order established by the law.
Page 192 - Is it because liberty in the abstract may be classed amongst the blessings of mankind, that I am seriously to felicitate a madman, who has escaped from the protecting restraint and wholesome darkness of his cell, on his restoration to the enjoyment of light and liberty ? Am I to congratulate a highwayman and murderer, who has broke prison, upon the recovery of his natural rights ? This would be to act over again the scene of the criminals condemned to the galleys, and their heroic deliverer, the...
Page 157 - III. The nation is essentially the source of all sovereignty; nor can any individual, or any body of men, be entitled to any authority which is not expressly derived from it.
Page 158 - Men and of citizens, that force is instituted for the benefit of the community and not for the particular benefit of the persons with whom it is intrusted. XIII. A common contribution being necessary...
Page 155 - Our present danger from the example of a people, whose character knows no medium, is, with regard to government, a danger from anarchy; a danger of being led, through an admiration of successful fraud...
Page 159 - The right to property being inviolable and sacred, no one ought to be deprived of it, except in cases of evident public necessity, legally ascertained, and on condition of a previous just indemnity.

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