The Western Journal of Medicine and Surgery, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Prentice & Weissinger, 1840 - Medicine
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Page 15 - ... feelings to judge of its effects on others, and because it does not always manifest itself by determinate and uniform sensations. They do not feel the cold, but they have an uneasiness or an indisposition which arises from it; their constitution becomes deteriorated by passing through the alternations of health and disease ; and they sink under the action of an unknown cause. It is the more likely to be unknown because the injurious effects of cold do not always manifest themselves during, or...
Page 479 - His eccentricity continued during his existence, and towards the last he is reported to have joked upon the ocdematous state of his legs produced by the disturbance of the circulation and his difficulty of breathing. Some one inquired of him how he was ? to which he replied, " Why, I am better on my legs than ever : you see how much stouter they are?" His hobby retained full possession also to the end of his life. He attributed his disease to the stomach. He said, " it is all stomach ; we use our...
Page 487 - ... neighbours ; and upon entering the apartment, they found the woman seated on a stool, before the fire, with a vessel of warm water in front of her, and a large substance, which they compared to a child's head and neck, lying between her thighs, supported by her hands.
Page 366 - During the display of electric power, so awful to an ordinary observer, the electrician sits quietly in front of the apparatus, conducts the lightning in any required direction, and employs it to fuse wires, decompose fluids, or fire inflammable substances ; and when the effects are too powerful, to attend to such experiments securely, he connects the insulated wire with the ground, and transmits the accumulated electricity with silence, and with safety.
Page 392 - ... age, and twenty-two were examined; and of these last, five only were found to possess all the qualifications essential to an appointment. It may be that we have ere.cted too high a standard of merit that too much is exacted from the human intellect ; we are not conscious, however, that more has been asked, than ordinary talents, a good primary education, and the actual study of the science of medicine, can attain. At all events, some few have reached the highest scale of excellence; and while...
Page 479 - The Count was wounded in the arm the bullet had sunk deep into the flesh it was, however, extracted and he is now in a fair way of recovery.' That will do very well for a novel, but it won't do for us, Gentlemen : for ' Sir Ralph Abercromby received a ball in the thick part of his thigh, and it buried itself deep, deep : and it got among important parts, and it couldn't be felt; but the surgeons, nothing daunted, groped, and groped, and groped, and Sir Ralph died.
Page 354 - What would you do in such a case as this ? Did this woman die from shock, or from loss of blood, or from a combination of the two? I have never met a case where the loss of a pint and a half of blood without other complication caused death ; but I must admit that such a hemorrhage is a serious matter.
Page 345 - ... excruciating commencing immediately over the first left superior molaris, thence shooting back to the angle of the jaw, then to the ala of the nose, inner angle of the eye, and not unfrequently to the top of the head. Ulceration had taken place in the mucous membrane of the affected nostril, and a thin fetid matter, occasionally streaked with pus and blood, was almost constantly discharged, excoriating the parts with which it came in contact. The cavity of the nostril had become so much closed...
Page 68 - Singular Case of a Woman delivered of Five Children. GIUSEPPA CALIFANI, of Naples, at the age of fourteen years and three months, was married to a man aged twenty-seven, by whom she had ten children at eight accouchements ; at the fifth and sixth producing twins. She lived with her husband ten years, and remained a widow three years after his death ; she then took a second husband, whose age was about twentynine. After two regular accouchements upon her third pregnancy she became enormously large...
Page 96 - is a disease that affects the whole system ; it affects the head, the trunk of the body, and the extremities ; it affects the circulation, the absorption, and the nervous system; it affects the skin, the muscular fibres, and the membranes; it affects the body, and affects likewise the mind.

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