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Taintor Bros., Merrill, 1880 - Readers - 218 pages
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Page 216 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them " Hiawatha's Chickens." Of all beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid, Talked with them whene'er he...
Page 215 - Nokomis?" And the good Nokomis answered ; " That is but the owl and owlet, Talking in their native language, Talking, scolding at each other.
Page 155 - You yet may spy the fawn at play, The hare upon the green; But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. "To-night will be a stormy night, You to the town must go; And take a lantern, Child, to light Your mother through the snow.
Page 208 - There are notes of joy from the hang-bird and wren, And the gossip of swallows through all the sky; The ground-squirrel gayly chirps by his den, And the wilding bee hums merrily by.
Page 156 - The wretched parents all that night Went shouting far and wide; But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. At day-break on a hill they stood That overlooked the moor; And thence they saw the bridge of wood, A furlong from their door. They wept @ and, turning homeward, cried, "In heaven we all ) shall meet;" @ When in the snow the mother spied The print of Lucy's feet.
Page 155 - Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray: And, when I crossed the wild, I chanced to see at break of day The solitary child. No mate, no comrade Lucy knew; She dwelt on a wide moor, The sweetest thing that ever grew Beside a human door! You yet may spy the fawn at play, The hare upon the green; But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. "To-night will be a stormy night You to the town must go...
Page 156 - But never reached the town. The wretched parents all that night Went shouting far and wide: But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. At daybreak on a hill they stood That overlooked the moor; And thence they saw the bridge of wood, A furlong from their door. They wept - and, turning homeward, cried, "In heaven we all shall meet"; - When in the snow the mother spied The print of Lucy's feet.
Page 157 - They followed from the snowy bank Those footmarks, one by one, Into the middle of the plank; And further there were none!
Page 209 - There's a dance of leaves in that aspen bower, There's a titter of winds in that beechen tree, There's a smile on the fruit and a smile on the flower, And a laugh from the brook that runs to the sea. And look at the broad-faced sun, how he smiles On the dewy earth that smiles in his ray, On the leaping waters and gay young isles ; Ay, look, and he'll smile thy gloom away.
Page 158 - Yet some maintain that to this day She is a living child ; That you may see sweet Lucy Gray Upon the lonesome wild.

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