Extinction and Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds

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University of Chicago Press, Oct 15, 2006 - Science - 594 pages
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Sprinkled across the tropical Pacific, the innumerable islands of Oceania are home to some of the most unique bird communities on the planet, and they sustain species found nowhere else on earth. Many of the birds that live in this region are endangered, however; many more have become extinct as a result of human activity, in both recent and prehistoric times.

Reconstructing the avian world in the same way archeologists re-create ancient human societies, David Steadman—a leading authority on tropical Pacific avian paleontology—has spent the past two decades in the field, digging through layers of soil in search of the bones that serve as clues to the ancient past of island bird communities. His years of indefatigable research and analysis are the foundation for Extinction and Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds, a monumental study of the landbirds of tropical Pacific islands—especially those from Fiji eastward to Easter Island—and an intricate history of the patterns and processes of island biology over time. 

Using information gleaned from prehistoric specimens, Steadman reconstructs the birdlife of tropical Pacific islands as it existed before the arrival of humans and in so doing corrects the assumption that small, remote islands were unable to support rich assemblages of plants and animals. Easter Island, for example, though devoid of wildlife today, was the world’s richest seabird habitat before Polynesians arrived more than a millennium ago. The forests of less isolated islands in the Pacific likewise teemed with megapodes, rails, pigeons, parrots, kingfishers, and songbirds at first human contact. 

By synthesizing data from the distant past, Steadman hopes to inform present conservation programs. Grounded in geology, paleontology, and archeology, but biological at its core, Extinction and Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds is an exceptional work of unparalleled scholarship that will stimulate creative discussions of terrestrial life on oceanic islands for years to come.
  

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Contents

Geography and Geology
3
Terrestrial Flora and Fauna
40
Human History
71
Birds Living and Dead on Islands and in Museums
88
Part II
109
Melanesia
111
West Polynesia
160
East Polynesia
209
Passerines
368
Seabirds
386
Part IV
403
Extinction
405
Dispersal Colonization and Faunal Attenuation
418
Equilibrium and Turnover
449
SpeciesArea Relationships
462
Community Ecology
481

Micronesia and Remote Central Pacific Islands
253
Part III
285
Megapodes
287
Rails
296
Pigeons and Doves
320
Parrots
342
Other Nonpasserine Landbirds
352
Conservation Biology
496
Conclusions and Suggestions for Future Research
510
Appendix
521
Literature Cited
529
Systematic Index
575
General Index
587
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

David W. Steadman is curator of birds at the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida.

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