Eleazer Williams Not the Dauphin of France: A Lecture Read Before the Chicago Historical Society December 4, 1902 (Google eBook)

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Fergus Printing Company, 1903 - 35 pages
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Page 3 - I spoke loud also, and said, that as he, by his disclosure, had put me in the position of a superior, I must assume that position, and frankly say that my indignation was stirred by the memory, that one of the family of Orleans had imbrued his hands in my father's blood, and that another now wished to obtain from me an abdication of the throne. When I spoke of superiority, the Prince immediately assumed a respectful attitude, and remained silent for several minutes, It had now grown very late, and...
Page 29 - The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel among the Indians, and others, in North America," and may have been influenced by the hope expressed by Mr.
Page 3 - King, his father, who he said was actuated in making the proposition more by feelings of kindness and piety towards me than by any other consideration, since his claim to the French throne rested on an entirely different basis to mine, viz., not that of hereditary descent, but of popular election. When he spoke in this strain I spoke loud also, and said that as he, by his disclosure, had put me in...
Page 3 - ... towards me than by any other consideration, since his claim to the French throne rested on an entirely different basis to mine, viz. not that of hereditary descent, but of popular election. When he spoke in this strain I spoke loud also, and said, that as he, by his disclosure, had put me in the position of a superior, I must assume that position, and frankly say that my indignation was stirred by the memory, that one of the family of Orleans had imbrued his hands in my father's blood, and that...
Page 33 - I do not believe there is a word of truth in it." Williams broke into a hearty laugh and retorted, "Nor do I either." And when Williams met his lifelong friend, Alexander Grignon of Green Bay, Williams asked him if he had read anything about the dauphin matter. "Yes, I have," was the reply with a laugh and a manner evincing his total disbelief of the story.
Page 19 - lies the mystery of my life. I know nothing about my infancy. Everything that occurred to me is blotted out, entirely erased, irrecoverably gone. My mind is a blank until thirteen or fourteen years of age. You must imagine a child who, as far as he knows anything, was an idiot, destitute even of consciousness that can be remembered until that period. He was bathing on Lake George, among a group of Indian boys. He clambered with the fearlessness of idiocy to the top of a high rock. He plunged down...
Page 32 - His neatly finished rooms had neither carpets, curtains nor furniture, save a scanty supply of broken chairs and invalid tables; boxes filled with books, the gifts of friends, lay stored away in corners; his dining table, unmoved from week to week, and covered with the broken remains of former repasts, and his pantry and sleeping room disordered and filthy, left upon the visitor an oppressive feeling of homeless solitude that it was impossible to efface from the memory.
Page 12 - Umph/ or some other characteristic and guttural exclamation, and then perhaps spring across the room, and make a true Indian assault upon a child, on whom they had fixed their eyes, to his no small affright and consternation ;— or else dart out of the house, and take to their heels in such a direction, as their whims might incline them.
Page 29 - Annals." All at once I was startled by a sudden movement, and on looking up, I saw Williams sitting upright and stiff in his chair, his eyes fixed and wide open, his hands clenched on the table, his whole frame shaken and trembling, as if a paralysis had seized him. I thought it had. I exclaimed , " What is the matter ? " and I rose quickly to rouse him ; for no answer came. It was a minute or more before he could speak. But with great effort he raised his hand, and, pointing to one of the wood-cut...
Page 29 - and I rose quickly to rouse him ; for no answer came. It was a minute or more before he could speak. But with great effort he raised his hand, and, pointing to one of the wood-cut portraits, at the bottom of the page, said, in a hollow voice and with great difficulty of utterance, "That image has haunted me, day and night, as long as I can remember. 'Tis the horrid vision of my dreams. What is it ? Who is it ? " I looked. There was no name on the page. On turning the leaf, I read that this number...

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