The 1990s (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2003 - Social Science - 270 pages
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The last decade of the millennium was, in many ways, the most diverse and fascinating in the history of American culture. Alternative subcultures gained unprecedented exposure, manifest in such phenomena as grunge music, "gansta" rap, hip-hop fashion, raves, extreme sports, and the art of Robert Mapplethorpe and Andres Serrano. Twin Peaks, The X-Files, and The Phantom Menace brought science fiction to the mainstream. Bands such as Nirvana and Pearl Jam spread the Seattle rock scene across America. And even coffeehouse culture went mainstream with the proliferation of the Starbucks chain. Ethnic minorities, youth culture, and homosexual society all achieved larger roles in shaping the American identity. Meanwhile, corporate America pressed onward in its never-ending search for high ratings, giant profits, and more "bang for its buck." The twelve narrative chapters in this book depict the United States as brought to you by Generation X--a culture busting out in new and unforeseen ways. The volume also includes chapter bibliographies, a timeline, cost comparisons, and lists of suggested further reading.
  

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Contents

Everyday America
3
World of Youth
25
Popular Culture of the 1990s
45
Advertising
47
Architecture
63
Fads Games Toys Hobbies and Sports
77
Fashion
103
Food
123
Music
161
Performing Arts
179
Travel
203
Visual Arts
221
Cost of Products in the 1990s
237
Notes
239
Further Reading
251
Index
259

Literature
141

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Page xiii - We have said already that it is far more than entertainment and leisure time activities. It is the bone and flesh of a society from which the spirit emanates and soars or falls. Popular culture is the way of life in which and by which most people in any society live. In a democracy like the United States, it is the voice of the people their practices, likes, and dislikes the lifeblood of their daily existence, a way of life. The popular culture is the voice of democracy, speaking and...

About the author (2003)

Marc Oxoby received his BA from San Jose State University and now lives in Reno, Nevada, where he is a doctoral candidate in the University of Nevada, Reno English Department. He has worked as a disc jockey and as the editor of the small-press literary journal CRiME CLUb. He currently teaches English and Humanities classes at UNR. A regular contributor to the scholarly journal _Film and History_, he has also written for several other periodicals, as well as for _The St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture_ and _The International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers_.

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