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Books Books 1 - 10 of 96 on Every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force....  
" Every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force that varies directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of the distance between them. "
An Introduction to Logic - Page 479
by Horace William Brindley Joseph - 1906 - 564 pages
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Uranography: Or, a Description of the Heavens; Designed for Academies and ...

Ezra Otis Kendall - Astronomy - 1845 - 365 pages
...never was a law of such vast importance announced in so few words. The simple principle, that gravity varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance, enables us to infer it priori all of Kepler's laws. If one of several bodies of a system...
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A New Treatise on Astronomy, and the Use of the Globes, in Two Parts ...

James M'Intire - Astronomy - 1850 - 326 pages
...theory of gravitation as stated in the last and present articles, namely, that the force of attraction varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance, was first promulgated by Sir Isaac Newton ; and hence it is sometimes called, The Newtonian...
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The principles of mechanical philosophy applied to industrial mechanics ...

Thomas Turner Tate - Mechanical engineering - 1853 - 342 pages
...distance one-ninth, and so on. These two!laws are expressed by saying, — that the force of gravitation varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance. Bodies are attracted by the earth as if the whole of its mass were collected in its centre...
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The science of arithmetic, by J. Cornwell and J.G. Fitch

James Cornwell - History - 1855
...hour ; how far and how long must the first travel before he is overtaken by the second? 17. Gravity varies directly as the mass and inversely as the square of the distance. Compare the amount of the earth's attraction on two bodies, the one having a mass 35 at a...
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THE CHEMIST, A MONTHLY JOURNAL. VOL. II. 1855.

JOHN & CHARLES WATT, EDITORS - 1855
...but only tells us that all masses or portions of matter tend towards each other with a force which varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance. This law enables us to measure and calculate the force- of gravitation, but throws no gleam...
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An Elementary Course of Natural and Experimental Philosophy, Volume 1

Thomas Turner Tate - Science - 1855
...at treble oneninth, and so on. These two laws are expressed by saying, that the force of gravitation varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance. Bodies are attracted by the earth as if the whole of its mass were collected in its centre...
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Inaugural lectures delivered at the Liverpool ladies' college in 1856

Liverpool ladies' coll - 1857
...lying within the scope of the law that every particle of matter attracts every other with a force which varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance. It is the object of Philosophy to ascend from a knowledge of facts to a knowledge of laws;...
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POPULAR ASTRONOMY A CONCISE ELEMENTARY TREATISE OF THE SUN, PLANETS ...

O.M. MITCHEL - 1860
...planets exterior to the orbit of Mercury exert an amount of power on this nearest planet to the sun which varies directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance of the disturbing body. Let us suppose the earth and Venus to be in conjunction with Mercury,...
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Useful Information for Engineers: Third Series. As Comprised in a Series of ...

Sir William Fairbairn - Cables, Submarine - 1866 - 330 pages
...Xewton) the mechanism by which these masses are regulated in their orbits, by an attracting force which varies directly as the mass and inversely as the square of the distance. These wonderful achievements of the Great Author of Nature teach us lessons of humility as...
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Useful Information for Engineers: Being a Series of Lectures

Sir William Fairbairn - Engineering - 1866
...Newton) the mechanism by which these masses are regulated in their orbits, by an attracting force which varies directly as the mass and inversely as the square of the distance. These wonderful achievements of the Great Author of Nature teach us lessons of humility as...
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