Desperately Wicked: Philosophy, Christianity and the Human Heart (Google eBook)

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InterVarsity Press, Feb 4, 2009 - Philosophy - 181 pages
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What is the human heart like? Theologians and philosophers have attempted to address this question, not just in the abstract, but concretely in personal, as well as social and political, dimensions. Patrick Downey explores the biblical writings of Genesis and the Hebrew prophet Jeremiah, the Greek tragedies, Plato, Aristotle, and political philosophers--such as Rousseau, Hobbes, Nietzsche and René Girard--to seek answers to this profound question. Recognizing our resistance to know the truth about our own hearts, Downey calls his readers to join with these thinkers in the search for truth and serious self-reflection. Not for the faint of heart, this book courageously addresses the most foundational question of our existence as individuals in community. What is the nature of the human heart and can we, will we, know it?
  

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Desperately wicked: philosophy, Christianity and the human heart

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The central question that drives Downey's (philosophy, St. Mary's Coll., CA) text is whether the heart, or core, of every human is evil and how this philosophical perspective affects political ... Read full review

Review: Desperately Wicked: Philosophy, Christianity and the Human Heart

User Review  - Paul Duggan - Goodreads

Girardian. Need to digest this more. Someone else read it with me and talk about it :) Read full review

Contents

1
15
2
30
3
49
4
60
5
74
6
90
7
107
8
115
9
137
BiBliography
170
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Patrick Downey received his M.A. in theology from Harvard University and Ph.D. in theology from Boston College. He taught at Boston College, 1988-93 and at St. Mary's College of California since 1994. His areas of specialization are ethics, political philosophy, foundational theology and poetics. He is the author of Serious Comedy: The Philosophical and Theological Significance of Tragic and Comic Writing in the Western Tradition.

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