Fields of Wheat, Hills of Blood: Passages to Nationhood in Greek Macedonia, 1870-1990 (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago Press, Feb 15, 2009 - Social Science - 358 pages
2 Reviews
Deftly combining archival sources with evocative life histories, Anastasia Karakasidou brings welcome clarity to the contentious debate over ethnic identities and nationalist ideologies in Greek Macedonia. Her vivid and detailed account demonstrates that contrary to official rhetoric, the current people of Greek Macedonia ultimately derive from profoundly diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Throughout the last century, a succession of regional and world conflicts, economic migrations, and shifting state formations has engendered an intricate pattern of population movements and refugee resettlements across the region. Unraveling the complex social, political, and economic processes through which these disparate peoples have become culturally amalgamated within an overarchingly Greek national identity, this book provides an important corrective to the Macedonian picture and an insightful analysis of the often volatile conjunction of ethnicities and nationalisms in the twentieth century.

"Combining the thoughtful use of theory with a vivid historical ethnography, this is an important, courageous, and pioneering work which opens up the whole issue of nation-building in northern Greece."óMark Mazower, University of Sussex
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lilithcat - LibraryThing

A book so controversial that Cambridge University Press caved in to threats and declined to publish it. Why is it controversial? Because Karakasidou, a Greek, dared to say that Macedonia is not Greek ... Read full review

Fields of wheat, hills of blood: passages to nationhood in Greek Macedonia, 1870-1990

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

One rarely encounters a scholarly book as disturbing as this provocative work, a study of ethnicity in the Greek province of Macedonia. It is so controversial that Cambridge University Press, fearing ... Read full review

Contents

BETWEEN ORAL MEMORY AND WRITTEN HISTORY ReMembering the Past
33
EXCHANGING IDENTITIES The Makings of the Guvezna Market Community
56
CONVERGING FRONTIERS OF GREEK AND BULGARIAN NATIONALISM Religious Propaganda Educational Competition and National Enlight...
79
THE MACEDONIAN STRUGGLE IN GUVEZNA Violence Terror and the Scepter of National Liberation 19031908
110
CLASS REFORMATION AND NATIONAL HOMOGENIZATION PROCESSES OF CONSOLIDATION AND CHANGE FOLLOWING THE ADVE...
141
CROSSING THE MOVING FRONTIER Group Formation and Social Closure in the Era of Refugee Settlement 19221940
143
ADMINISTERING THE NEW LANDS OF GREEK MACEDONIA Class Reformation and National Homogenization 19131940
164
SPONSORING PASSAGES TO NATIONHOOD Material and Spiritual Patronage in Assiros
192
Reconstructing the Passages to Nationhood
220
Afterword
230
Genealogies
241
Tables
249
Notes
264
Bibliography
309
Index
323
Copyright

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Page 25 - It is nationalism which engenders nations, and not the other way round. Admittedly, nationalism uses the pre-existing, historically inherited proliferation of cultures or cultural wealth, though it uses them very selectively, and it most often transforms them radically.
Page 26 - Indian nationalism" is synonymous with "Hindu nationalism" is not the vestige of some premodern religious conception. It is an entirely modern, rationalist, and historicist idea. Like other modern ideologies, it allows for a central role of the state in the modernization of society and strongly defends the state's unity and sovereignty. Its appeal is not religious but political. In this sense, the framework of its reasoning is entirely secular.
Page 17 - They search backwards over the hills and valleys of historical events to trace the inexorable route of a given (or "chosen") population to the destiny of their national enlightenment and liberation. They transform history into national history, legitimizing the existence of a nation-state in the present-day by teleologically reconstructing its reputed past. Pedigrees of national descent are constructed, refined, and lengthened, and the ancestors of a "nation" become a vehicle for majority-group legitimation,...

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