The Mapmakers

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 2001 - History - 507 pages
34 Reviews
In his classic text, two-time Pulitzer Prize—winner John Noble Wilford recounts the history of cartography from antiquity to the space age. With this revised edition, Wilford brings the story up to the present day, as he shows the impact of new technologies that make it possible for cartographers to go where no one has been before, from the deepest reaches of the universe (where astronomers are mapping time as well as space) to the inside of the human brain. These modern-day mapmakers join the many earlier adventurers–including ancient Greek stargazers, Renaissance seafarers, and the explorers who mapped the American West–whose exploits shape this dramatic story of human inventiveness and limitless curiosity.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
12
4 stars
10
3 stars
9
2 stars
0
1 star
3

Review: The Mapmakers

User Review  - Toni Moore - Goodreads

"The Mapmakers" takes almost 500 pages to describe 3,000 years of mapmaking history and technology, but the story author John Noble Wilford tells is engaging enough to keep your interest until the end ... Read full review

Review: The Mapmakers

User Review  - Goodreads

I have always held the view that history has been greatly affected by the way people looked at the map. I call my thesis: "The Tyranny of Maps" . Your world view will completely change if only you ... Read full review

Contents

ELEVEN Soldiers Pundits and the India Survey
189
Tlie Boundary Malwrs
205
Westward the Topographers
223
fourteen Meiers Meridians and a New World Map
253
Bright Angel Point
263
SIXTEEN Badar Over the Amazon
296
eighteen A Continent Beneath the Ice
312
n i v Base Lilies Across a Continent
353
twentytwo Mapping from Space
409
I he Moon
426
Mars
446
rwENTYSix Cosmic Cartographers
463
Epilogue at Bright Angel
469
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
476
9 3
493
9 i
506

The Flight Out
368

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

John Noble Wilford is a science correspondent for The New York Times. He lives in New York.

Bibliographic information