A New Law Dictionary and Glossary: Containing Full Definitions of the Principal Terms of the Common and Civil Law, Together with Translations and Explanations of the Various Technical Phrases in Different Languages, Occuring in the Ancient and Modern Reports, and Standard Treatises : Embracing Also All the Principal Common and Civil Law Maxims : Compiled on the Basis of Spelman's Glossary, and Adapted to the Jurisprudence of the United States, with Copious Illustrations, Critical and Historical, Part 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J.S. Voorhies, 1851 - Law - 1099 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 664 - Municipal law, thus understood, is properly defined to be a 'rule of civil conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state, commanding what is right and prohibiting what is wrong.
Page 897 - A reversion is the residue of an estate left by operation of law in the grantor or his successors, or in the successors of a testator, commencing in possession on the determination of a particular estate granted or devised.
Page 978 - ... receive the sacrament of the Lord's supper, according to the usage of the Church of England...
Page 966 - is a rate or sum of money assessed on the person or property of a citizen by government for the use of the nation or state.
Page 607 - Incorporeal hereditaments are principally of ten sorts; advowsons, tithes, commons, ways, offices, dignities, franchises, corodies or pensions, annuities, and rents.
Page 657 - THE other remaining offence, that of kidnapping, being [ 219 ] the forcible abduction or stealing away of a man, woman, or child, from their own country, and sending them into another, was capital by the Jewish law.
Page 1061 - For water is a movable, wandering thing, and must of necessity continue common by the law of nature; so that I can only have a temporary, transient, usufructuary, property therein...
Page 679 - England," it is declared and enacted, that no freeman may be taken or imprisoned or be disseised of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.
Page 904 - Coke (vo1. 1, 1040,) is, that 'when the ancestor by any gift or conveyance takes an estate of freehold, and in the same gift or conveyance an estate is limited, either mediately or immediately, to his heirs in fee or in tail, that always in such cases 'the heirs' are words of limitation of the estate and not words of purchase.
Page 1005 - No court will lend its aid to a man who founds his cause of action upon an immoral or an illegal act. If, from the plaintiff's own stating or otherwise, the cause of action appears to arise ex turpi causa, or the transgression of a positive law of this country, there the Court says he has no right to be assisted. It is upon that ground the Court goes; not for the sake of the defendant, but because they will not lend their aid to such a plaintiff.