Contrasts: Or, A Parallel Between the Noble Edifices of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries and Similar Buildings of the Present Day. Shewing the Present Decay of Taste. Accompanied by Appropriate Text (Google eBook)

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Author and published, 1836 - Architecture, Gothic - 50 pages
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Page 41 - And although you be permitted to read holy scripture, and to have the word of God in your mother tongue, you must understand...
Page 1 - It will be readily admitted that the great test of Architectural beauty is the fitness of the design to the purpose for which it is intended, and that the style of a building should so correspond with its use that the spectator may at once perceive the purpose for which it was erected.
Page 42 - I am very sorry to know and hear how unreverently that most precious jewel, the word of God, is disputed, rhymed, sung, and jangled in every alehouse and tavern, contrary to the true meaning and doctrine of the same. And yet I am even as much sorry that the readers of the same follow it in doing so faintly and coldly...
Page 41 - ... be not clean and unspotted of malice and envy, for you rail on Bishops, speak slanderously of Priests, and rebuke and taunt Preachers, both contrary to good order and Christian fraternity.
Page 22 - The mechanical part of Gothic architecture is pretty well understood, but it is the principles which influenced ancient compositions, and the soul which appears in all the former works, which is so lamentably deficient ; nor, as I have before stated, can they be regained but by a restoration of the ancient feelings and sentiments. 'Tis they alone that can restore Gothic architecture...
Page 22 - Tis they alone that can restore Gothic architecture to its former glorious state ; without it all that is done will be a tame and heartless copy, true as far as the mechanism of the style goes, but utterly wanting in that sentiment and feeling that distinguishes ancient design.
Page 43 - I speak now only of the spoil made under this bishop, scarce were five years past after Bath's ruins ; but as fast went the axes and hammers to work at Wells. The goodly hall covered with lead (because the...
Page 21 - ... lately to examine the interior of this wonderful church, I was disgusted beyond measure at perceiving that the chapel of St. Paul had been half filled up with a huge figure of James Watt, sitting in an arm-chair, on an enormous square pedestal, with some tasteless ornaments, which, being totally unlike any Greek or Roman foliage, I suppose to have been intended by the sculptor to be Gothic. This is the production of no less a personhge than Sir F. Chantrey.
Page 41 - ... taunting stock against priests and preachers, as many light persons do. I am very sorry to know and hear, how unreverently that most precious jewel, the word of God, is disputed, rhymed, sung, and jangled in every alehouse and tavern, contrary to the true meaning and doctrine of the same.
Page 43 - Lady, late repayred by Stillington, a place of great reverence and antiquitie, was likewise defaced ; and such was their thirst after lead (I would they had drunke it scalding) that they tooke the dead bodies of Bishops out of their leaden coffins, and cast abroad the carkases skarce throughly putrified.

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