The Life and Public Services of James G. Blaine: With Incidents, Anecdotes, and Romantic Events Connected with His Early Life; Containing Also His Speeches and Important Historical Documents Relating to His Later Years ... (Google eBook)

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E.C. Allen & Company, 1884 - Politicians - 504 pages
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Page 97 - ... to provide and maintain a navy, and to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces...
Page 98 - The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite ; and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed. This power ought to be coextensive with all the possible combinations of such circumstances ; and ought to be under the direction of the same councils which are appointed to preside over the common defence.
Page 111 - Congress to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes. If a new law upon the same subject shall be proposed, its propriety will be duly considered. The Union must be preserved; and hence all indispensable means must be employed.
Page 386 - Duke. No might nor greatne'ss in mortality Can censure 'scape ; back-wounding calumny The whitest virtue strikes : What king so strong, Can tie the gall up in the slanderous tongue ? But who comes here ? Enter ESCALUS, Provost, Bawd, and Officers.
Page 120 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen, but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of selfpreservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation. To lose our country by a scrupulous adherence to written law, would be to lose the law itself, with life, liberty, property and all those who are enjoying them with us ; thus absurdly sacrificing the end to the means.
Page 264 - Senators and Representatives of the thirty-sixth and thirty-seventh Congresses, officers in the judicial, military, and naval service of the United States, heads of departments, and foreign ministers of the United States.
Page 360 - Without urging further the grounds of my opinion, I repeat, in conclusion, that it is the right and the duty of the United States to assert and maintain such supervision and authority over any interoceanic canal across the isthmus that connects North and South America as will protect our national interests.
Page 374 - It did not happen to me to be born in a log cabin ; but my elder brothers and sisters were born in a log cabin raised among the snowdrifts of New Hampshire, at a period so early that when the smoke first rose from its rude chimney and curled over the frozen hills, there was no similar evidence of a white man's habitation between it and the settlements on the rivers of Canada.
Page 111 - From the instant that your slaveholding states become the theatre of war, civil, servile, or foreign, from that instant the war powers of Congress extend to interference with the institution of slavery in every way by which it can be interfered with, from a claim, of indemnity for slaves taken or destroyed, to the cession of the state burdened with slavery to a foreign power.
Page 407 - ... equality of all men; for a united nation, assuring the rights of all citizens; for the elevation of labor; for an honest currency: for purity in legislation, and for integrity and accountability in all departments of the government, and it accepts anew the duty of leading in the work of progress and reform.

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