The orphan; or, Memoirs of Matilda, tr. [from Mathilde] by the hon. D.G. Osborne (Google eBook)

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Page 75 - Leave them alone! They will find out their error by and by. If you meddle with them, and they should fail, the failure will be laid at your door. It is being reported all about that you are paid by the employers to write the engineers down, and to set the labourers against them. If not for your own sake, at least for the sake of Democracy, say nothing more about them.
Page 212 - Why won't you box my ears, then ? " I persisted. It was my sole but unavailing prayer. He turned away towards the house. My trouble rose to agony. I made some wild motion of despair, and threw myself on the grass. He turned, looked at me for a moment in silence, and then said in a changed tone— " My boy, I am sorry for you. I beg you will not trouble yourself any more. The affair is not worth it. Such a trifle ! What can I do for you ?
Page 218 - ... that will certainly be a great pleasure for you ! He will say to you : " Read in my heart " ; he writes me this ; and, as you see, that patches everything up. I hope that when you read what he wants in his heart you will perhaps also read that such young lovers have their dangers ; and in addition that it is better to have me for a friend than an enemy.
Page 173 - I have not been to you what I ought to have been. I have never loved you enough : stay with us, do stay, and I'll be so different!
Page 207 - THIS note was the prelude to one of the most important, as well as one of the last, talks I had with Colonel Roosevelt.
Page 109 - I was so much moved that I could not utter a word ; a thousand conflicting thoughts distracted my mind.
Page 308 - I had planned with tolerable adroitness, it was requisite to inspire him with a blind confidence in my generosity and my friendship — you will see that I made a good use of my money.
Page 85 - My passion for you is unchangeable — fatal — because it ia without limits and without issue — it is unchangeable — fatal — because I love you a thousand times more than you love me...
Page 408 - If you are willing," said he, addressing our little hero, "I will go back with you to your mother. I begin to feel a strong interest in you, and may have it in my power to be of service to you." 14. After va'ri-ous questions had been kindly asked and frankly answered on the way, said Henry, "There is my mother's house. Mother will be very glad to get this money ; for she has not been able to pay her rent for the last quarter ;- and now | she can do it without any trouble.
Page 311 - M. de Rochegune, who accompanied him, seized M. Lugarto by the collar, with one hand, and double locked the door by which my two preservers had eu-cred.

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